On Intelligence

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Harvard University Press, 1996 - History - 288 pages
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Ceci argues that traditional conceptions of intelligence ignore the role of society in shaping intelligence and underestimate the intelligence of non-Western societies. He puts forth a "bio-ecological" framework of individual differences in intellectual development that is intended to address some of the major deficiencies of extant theories of intelligence. The focus is on alternative interpretations of phenomena that emerge when implicit assumptions of intelligence researchers are challenged.

 

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Contents

V
3
VI
4
VII
9
VIII
13
IX
15
X
19
XI
20
XII
21
LV
99
LVI
100
LVIII
106
LIX
108
LX
111
LXI
115
LXIII
116
LXIV
117

XIII
22
XIV
26
XV
29
XVI
31
XVII
33
XVIII
34
XIX
36
XXI
38
XXII
40
XXIII
41
XXIV
45
XXV
46
XXVI
49
XXVII
51
XXVIII
52
XXIX
54
XXX
55
XXXI
57
XXXII
63
XXXIII
65
XXXIV
69
XXXV
70
XXXVI
73
XXXVII
74
XXXVIII
76
XL
77
XLII
78
XLIV
83
XLV
84
XLVII
85
XLVIII
86
XLIX
87
L
88
LI
91
LII
93
LIII
94
LIV
95
LXVI
119
LXVII
123
LXVIII
129
LXX
133
LXXI
136
LXXII
139
LXXIII
141
LXXIV
146
LXXV
154
LXXVI
156
LXXVIII
157
LXXIX
158
LXXX
160
LXXXI
165
LXXXII
170
LXXXIII
176
LXXXIV
178
LXXXVI
180
LXXXVII
181
LXXXVIII
184
XC
185
XCI
188
XCII
193
XCIII
195
XCV
197
XCVI
198
XCVII
200
XCVIII
203
XCIX
206
C
210
CI
214
CII
217
CIII
221
CIV
253
CV
263
CVI
285
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About the author (1996)

Stephen J. Ceci is Helen L. Carr Professor of Psychology at Cornell University.

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