Spring Awakening

Front Cover
Bloomsbury Academic, 1980 - Drama - 59 pages
4 Reviews
Wedekind's play about adolescent sexuality is as disturbing today as when it was first produced. Spring Awakening was written in 1891 but had to wait the greater part of a century before it received its first complete performance in Britain, at the National Theatre in 1974. The production was highly praised, much of its strength deriving from this translation by Edward Bond and Elisabeth Bond Pablé. For this edition the translator, Edward Bond, has written a note on the play and a factual introduction to Wedekind's life and work.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - bakabaka84 - LibraryThing

It would seem that even in the 19th century teenagers were full on angst. At its hart the play is a criticism of 19th century German society's sexual repressiveness. The main plot of the story is how ... Read full review

A dark and moving play

User Review  - John K. - Borders

I recently saw the musical version of Spring Awakening, and wanted to see how the play compares. The musical stays pretty faithful to the script from the play, but it does not include The Masked Man ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
17
Section 3
35
Copyright

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About the author (1980)

Frank Wedekind (1864-1918) was a journalist, advertising manager, secretary to a circus, cabaret artiste, satirist, convict and actor as well as the author of twenty-one plays, many of which reflect aspects of his extraordinary career. He paid for the publication of Spring Awakening (1891), though it was not staged till 1906. (In England it was banned from public performance until 1963.) Earth Spirit (1895), the first of his plays to be seen on stage (1898), introduced the sexually voracious Lulu, who also figured in Pandora's Box (1904) and subsequently in Alban Berg's opera (Lulu, 1935) and in Peter Barnes' conflation of the two plays seen in England in 1970. Other notable plays include The Marquis of Keith (1900; British premiere, 1974), King Nicolo (1902), Castle Wetterstein (1910) and Franziska (1912). Wedekind was greatly admired by Brecht, and his satiric songs still have considerable bite.

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