Gandhi: Struggling for Autonomy

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Rowman & Littlefield, 1998 - History - 265 pages
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This compelling introduction to Gandhi's political thought goes beyond his well-known writings to present a much broader portrait that will be valuable to students of political theory, philosophy, and history. Using the principle of individual autonomy_rather than civil disobedience, Indian independence, or duty_as an analytical lens, Ronald J. Terchek offers a completely original interpretation of his subject's political thought. Terchek argues that Gandhi's thought is animated by a concern for the equal respect and regard for all persons, and he describes how Gandhi's writings illuminate several critical discourses in political theory, debates that overlap with many Western writers to whom Gandhi is seldom compared. Throughout the book, Terchek demonstrates that the teachings and work of Gandhi continue to be relevant today, and that he should be viewed as a significant political thinker not only within the Hindu tradition but in the broader context of 20th century political thought.
 

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Contents

III
21
IV
53
V
77
VI
107
VII
139
VIII
179
IX
229
X
239
XI
241
XII
255
XIII
257
XIV
265
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Page 16 - On examination I have found it to be the most tolerant of all religions known to me. Its freedom from dogma makes a forcible appeal to me inasmuch as it gives the votary the largest scope for self-expression.

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About the author (1998)

Ronald J. Terchek is professor of government and politics at the University of Maryland, College Park, and the author of Republican Paradoxes and Liberal Anxieties: Retrieving Neglected Fragments of Political Theory (Rowman & Littlefield, 1996).

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