The Englishwoman in Russia: Impressions of the Society and Manners of the Russians at Home

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Charles Scribner, 1855 - Russia - 299 pages
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Page 323 - A TREATISE, INTENDED TO EXPLAIN AND ILLUSTRATE THE PHYSIology of Fruit Trees, the Theory and Practice of all Operations connected with the Propagation, Transplanting, Pruning and Training of Orchard and Garden Trees, as Standards, Dwarfs, Pyramids, Espalier, &c.
Page 323 - THE PHYSIology of Fruit Trees, the Theory and Practice of all Operations connected with the Propagation, Transplanting, Pruning and Training of Orchard and Garden Trees, as Standards, Dwarfs, Pyramids, Espalier, Ac. The Laying out and Arranging different kinds of Orchards and Gardens...
Page 206 - A party of peasantwomen and girls assemble in some retired, unfrequented spot, and light a large fire, over which they leap in succession. If by chance any one of the other sex should be found near the place, or should have seen them in the act of performing the heathenish rite, it is at the imminent hazard of his life, for the women would not scruple to sacrifice him for his temerity : I was assured that such instances had often been known.
Page 318 - A COMPLETE ANALYSIS OF THE HOLY BIBLE. Containing the whole of the Old and New Testaments, collected and arranged systematically, In thirty books (based on the work of the learned Talbot), together with an Introduction setting forth the character of the work, and the immense facility this method affords for understanding the Word of God : also three different Tables of Contents prefixed, and a general Index subjoined, so elaborated and arranged, in alphabetical order, as to direct at once to any...
Page 151 - Ihe most likely to serve his owner's views, was most distasteful to himself, as he had genius for better things. He had no sooner served his time than the amount of poll-tax was yearly demanded : as everybody does not have a likeness taken, especially in a provincial town, it was no small difficulty to pay it. When we last saw him he had pined into a decline, and doubtless ere this the village grave has closed over his griefs and sorrows, and buried his genius in the shades of its eternal oblivion.
Page 324 - Europe, and has passed through the ordeal of criticism in the leading Quarterlies and Journals of both countries and received the highest commendation. The expense of the English edition, however, is such as necessarily to limit its circulation in this country, and the desire has been repeatedly expressed that the work should be published in a form and at a price which would bring it within the reach of ministers, students, and intelligent readers generally. The present edition, it is believed, will...
Page 323 - A mass of useful information is collected, which will give the work a value even to those who possess the best works on the cultivation of fruit yet published.
Page 84 - ... governor's table ; his agreeable manners and accomplishments, joined to his misfortune, made him a general favorite, and caused much interest ; he could read French, German, Russian, and Polish ; was a connoisseur of art, and showed us several pretty drawings of his own execution. Two or three times I was struck with an expression of more intelligence in his face than one would expect when any conversation was going on behind his back. It was not until three years after, that I accidentally heard...
Page 323 - ... extremely practical, containing such simple and comprehensive directions for all wishing at any time to build, being in fact the sum of the author's study and experience as an architect for many years.
Page 324 - February, 1854, after a highly commendatory criticism of this work, makes the following remarks : " We commend the book to that numerous class, increasing every day, whose early culture has necessarily been defective, but whose intelligence and thirst for knowledge is continually sharpened by the general diffusion of thought and education. Such persons, if they are already Christians by conviction, are naturally more and more dissatisfied with the popular commentaries on the Bible ; and if they are...

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