Swallow

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ReadHowYouWant.com, 2006 - Fiction - 628 pages
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Have I not told you, father of Swallow, she answered, "that it was to save you from death? But a few minutes over an hour ago, fifteen perhaps, a word was spoken to me at your stead yonder and now I am here, seven leagues away, having ridden faster than I wish to ride again, or than any other horse in this country can travel with a man upon its back."
 

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Contents

CHAPTER I
1
CHAPTER II
13
CHAPTER III
29
CHAPTER IV
43
CHAPTER V
61
CHAPTER VI
80
CHAPTER VII
96
CHAPTER VIII
111
CHAPTER XIX
307
CHAPTER XX
324
CHAPTER XXI
339
CHAPTER XXII
359
CHAPTER XXIII
374
CHAPTER XXIV
394
CHAPTER XXV
409
CHAPTER XXVI
427

CHAPTER IX
126
CHAPTER X
144
CHAPTER XI
159
CHAPTER XII
180
CHAPTER XIII
199
CHAPTER XIV
221
CHAPTER XV
237
CHAPTER XVI
253
CHAPTER XVII
274
CHAPTER XVIII
286
CHAPTER XXVII
444
CHAPTER XXVIII
461
CHAPTER XXIX
476
CHAPTER XXX
491
CHAPTER XXXI
507
CHAPTER XXXII
522
CHAPTER XXXIII
539
CHAPTER XXXIV
558
CHAPTER XXXV
578
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About the author (2006)

Sir Henry Rider Haggard (1856-1925) is best remembered for his 34 adventure fantasy novels set in exotic locations. As a child, Haggard, whose father was an English barrister, was considered dim-witted and was inclined to daydreaming. His parents ended his formal education when he was seventeen, and he was sent to work in South Africa, where his imagination was inspired by the people, animals, and jungle. He became close friends with authors Rudyard Kipling and Andrew Lang. Haggard's most popular books are King Solomon's Mines (1886) and She (1887). He also wrote short stories, as well as nonfiction on topics such as gardening, English farming, and rural life, interests which led to duties on government commissions concerned with land maintenance. For his literary contributions and his government service, Haggard was knighted in 1912. Several of Haggard's novels have been filmed. She was filmed in 1965, starring Ursula Andress. King Solomon's Mines was filmed with Stewart Granger and Deborah Kerr in 1950, and again with Richard Chamberlain and Sharon Stone in 1985. Also, the novel Allan Quatermain was filmed as Allan Quatermain and the Lost City of Gold with Richard Chamberlain and Sharon Stone in 1986.

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