GĀristofánous@ Ploûtos@. The Plutus of Aristophanes, from the text of Dindorf, with remarks by H.P. Cookesley

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Popular passages

Page 23 - The eye that mocketh at his father, and despiseth to obey his mother, the ravens of the valley shall pick it out, and the young eagles shall eat it.
Page 8 - The fact is, that in this kind of verse, the comic poets admit anapests more willingly and frequently into the first, third, and fifth places, than into the second, fourth, and sixth. Of the seventy anapests which we have observed in the eleven plays of Aristophanes, twenty-two, or nearly one-third, occur in the first place.
Page 13 - With the exception of the catalectic dipodia, they appear to admit anapests into every place, but more frequently into the first and third, than into the second and fourth. Strictly speaking, indeed, there is no difference in this metre between the second and fourth feet, as a system or set of dimeter iambics is nothing more than one long verse divided for convenience of arrangement into portions, each containing four feet. That the quantity of the final syllable of each dimeter is not indifferent...
Page 67 - let me see ; " \ícrtrú>fí' àvépa TOVTOV, " let me supplicate this man." 2. The subjunctive is employed in questions of indecision and doubt, when a person asks himself or another what he is to do. In these cases, it occurs, as in the previous instances, without at/, and with or without an interrogative particle. Thus : A.v6t fieva учета тоТоч, ще веш /лета a...
Page xviii - Chremylus in this and the preceding verse gives a reason why he thought it not worth while to consult Apollo about a plan of life for himself; his own days, he concluded, were nearly spent. Brunck, therefore, is mistaken in supposing ßiov to mean * facilitates.
Page 13 - ... third, than into the second and fourth. Strictly speaking, indeed, there is no difference in this metre between the second and fourth feet, as a system or set of dimeter iambics is nothing more than one long verse divided for convenience of arrangement into portions, each containing four feet. That the quantity of the final syllable of each dimeter is not indifferent, has been remarked by Brunck, from whose hands we beg leave to rescue the following passage : Пш' avTov avopiKoÓTciTa, KOI TOÎS...
Page xxiv - Haec regula, plerumque vera, nonnunquam ab jEschylo, Sophocle, Aristophane violatur, ab Euripide, credo, nunquam. Нес. 298. 100. татг' t/íou, ie та ¿TTÍ, ( omnia de me.

Bibliographic information