The Trend of Economic Thinking: Essays on Political Economists and Economic History

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University of Chicago Press, 1991 - Political Science - 388 pages
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The Iron Curtain has been cast aside. The Berlin Wall has fallen. Germany has been reunited. And F. A. Hayek's forceful predictions of the inevitable failure of socialism and central economic planning are now rendered irrefutable. Yet Hayek still rightfully cautions us to heed his arguments, warning that "in economics you can never establish a truth once and for all but have always to convince every generation anew."

The Trend of Economic Thinking captures Hayek's views on political economists and economic history—on Mandeville, Hume, Cantillon, Adam Smith, and Henry Thornton. Framed by insightful editorial notes, fifteen newly collected essays—including five previously unpublished pieces and two others never before available in English—provide a fascinating introduction to the historical context of political economy and the evolution of monetary practices. In a highlight of the collection, "On Being an Economist," Hayek reflects on the influence of economists, the time required for new ideas to take hold, the best way to educate economic theorists, and the need to follow one's own interests, often in opposition to fashionable beliefs. As always, the words of this outspoken scholar are sure to provoke debate.
 

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Contents

IV
17
V
35
VI
49
VII
56
VIII
73
IX
75
X
79
XI
101
XVI
177
XVII
216
XVIII
245
XIX
295
XX
345
XXI
347
XXII
373
XXIII
375

XII
119
XIII
125
XIV
127
XV
155
XXIV
376
XXV
377
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About the author (1991)

F. A. Hayek (1899-1992), recipient of the Medal of Freedom in 1991 and co-winner of the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics in 1974, was a pioneer in monetary theory and a leading proponent of classical liberalism  in the twentieth century. He taught at the University of London, the University of Chicago, and the University of Freiburg.

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