The Quarterly review, Volume 31

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Page 49 - But ye are a chosen generation, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, a peculiar people...
Page 289 - Piety displays Her mouldering roll, the piercing eye explores New manners, and the pomp of elder days, Whence culls the pensive bard his pictured stores. Nor rough nor barren are the winding ways Of hoar antiquity, but strown with flowers.
Page 362 - We should as soon expect the people of Woolwich to suffer themselves to be fired off upon one of Congreve's ricochet rockets, as trust themselves to the mercy of such a machine going at such a rate. We will back old Father Thames against the Woolwich Railway for any sum.
Page 310 - Ye gentle birds, that perch aloof, And smooth your pinions on my roof, Preparing for departure hence Ere winter's angry threats commence ; Like you my soul would smooth her plume For longer flights beyond the tomb. " May God, by whom is seen and heard Departing man and wandering bird, In mercy mark us for His own And guide us to the land unknown!
Page 243 - Let him study these in the manner I recommend, and let him never cease to pray for the illumination of that Spirit by which these books were dictated; and the whole compass of abstruse philosophy and recondite history shall furnish no argument with which the perverse will of man shall be able to shake this learned Christian's faith.
Page 242 - I will not scruple to assert that the most illiterate Christian, if he can but read his English Bible, and will take the pains to read it in this manner, will not only attain all that practical knowledge which is necessary to his salvation, but, by God's blessing, he will become learned in every thing relating to his religion, in such a degree, that he will not be liable to be misled, either by the refined...
Page 480 - The other is a little, old, gray-muzzled curmudgeon, with an unhappy eye, that kindles like a coal if you only look at him ; his nose turns up ; his mouth is drawn into wrinkles, so as to show his teeth ; in short, he has altogether the look of a dog far gone in misanthropy, and totally sick of the world. When he walks, he has his tail curled up so tight that it seems to lift his feet from the ground ; and he seldom makes use of more than three legs at a time, keeping the other drawn up as a reserve....
Page 284 - It seems to be a kind of duty incumbent on those who devote themselves to poetry, to raise, if possible, the dignity of a declining art, by making it as beneficial to life and manners as the limits of composition, and the character of modern times will allow.
Page 258 - F.uler ; to which are added, Solutions of several Miscellaneous Problems, with Questions and Examples for the Practice of the Student. By C. Taylor. 8vo, 10s. 6d. boards. A Practical System of Algebra, designed for the use of Schools and Private Students. By P. Nicholson, and J. Rowbotham. 12mo, 2s. 6d. boards. A Key to Bonnycastle's Introduction to Mensuration.
Page 486 - Alas ! how little do we appreciate a mother's tenderness while living! how heedless are we in youth of all her anxieties and kindness ! But when she is dead and gone; when the cares and coldness of the world come withering to our hearts...

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