The Littlest Wolf

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Harper Collins, Apr 16, 2002 - Juvenile Fiction - 40 pages
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The littlest wolf is worried: "I don't roll as straight as Frankie!" "I don't run as fast as Ana!" "I don't pounce as high as Tyler!" he complains.

But his father is wise. He listens to his son's concerns. He shows him what he can do. And he helps the littlest wolf realize that all is as it should be.

Larry Dane Brimner's story is heartwarming and reassuring. Jose Aruego and Ariane Dewey's paintings capture, with tenderness and humor, one special relationship. Together they have created a timeless celebration of fatherhood.

 

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Contents

Section 1
Section 2
Section 3
Section 4
Section 5
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Larry Dane Brimner was born in St. Petersburg, Florida, and spent his early childhood exploring Alaska's Kodiak Island. He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in British Literature from San Diego State University, where he graduated cum laude, and later received advanced degrees in writing and curriculum development. During his twenty-year teaching career, he began to write for publication. Brimner made his debut in children's books with the publication of BMX Freestyle in 1987. It was named an International Reading Association Children's Choice book for 1988. This title was followed by Country Bear's Good Neighbor, which the American Booksellers Association named their "Pick of the List." Brimner wrote A Migrant Family, which was named a Notable Trade Book in the Field of Social Studies (NCSS/CBC); Max and Felix , a nominee for the Kentucky Bluegrass Award; Voices From the Camps, cited as a Best Book for the Teen Age by New York Public Library; Snowboarding, an IRA Children's Choice for 1998; and the Official M&M'sŪ Book of the Millennium, an IRA Children's Choice for 2000. Brimner is the author of more than 110 books for young people. He also speaks to school children about the writing process or to teachers at conferences. In 2014 his title, Strike: The Farm Workers Fight for Their Rights, made the Civil Rights Hot Title's List.

Jose Aruego was born in Manila, the Philippines on August 9, 1932. He completed a law degree at the University of the Philippines but chose a career as an illustrator instead. He moved to New York City in the l950's to attend Parsons School of Design. His first job after art school was pasting feathers on angel wings in an art studio. Before he started illustrating books, he was a cartoonist for two years. His first children's book, The King and His Friends, was published in 1969. During his lifetime, he illustrated 82 children's books including Herman the Helper written by Robert Kraus and We Hide, You Seek and Dance Away written by George Shannon. He worked on several books with his wife and long-time collaborator Ariane Dewey including Whose Mouse Are You?, Leo the Late Bloomer, and Gregory the Terrible Eater. In 1976, he was received with the Outstanding Filipino Abroad in the Arts Award from the government of the Philippines. He died on August 9, 2012 at the age of 80.

As a team, Ariane Dewey and Jose Aruego have illustrated over sixty children's books, including Little Louie the Baby Bloomer and Leo the Late Bloomer. She lives in New York City.In Her Own Words...

"My very first memory is of dark blue walls and off-white trim. My mother confirms this unusual baby-girl's-room color scheme in the house where I lived until age one. Possibly this is why one of my favorite colors is darkish blue-jean blue. The other is brilliant orange.

"As a child I pored over Chicago's Shedd Aquarium catalog of exotically colored fish that seemed too gaudy to be real. My mother and I looked through art books and then sketched portraits of each other or painted watercolors of the armloads of wildflowers we picked. We still love to discuss the subtle juxtapositions of the colorful scenes and objects around us.

"Art was the most enjoyable part of school. I liked to squish gobs of finger paint on wet paper, or to write, illustrate, and bind stories into books, or, best of all, to paint stage sets for the school plays. I began to look at whatever I saw in terms of which medium--oil, pastel, collage, watercolor--would best catch the mood and texture before me. At Sarah Lawrence College I majored in painting and sculpture. After graduation I couldn't find an auto body shop willing to lend me space to work on welded sculptures. So I got a job with an industrial design firm doing picture research, among other more mundane tasks, and later became an art editor for a textbook publisher.

"Soon after that I began writing and illustrating books for children with Jose Aruego, whimsical books with his clever lines and my vivid colors. Jose draws and I paint. We have illustrated some sixty books together, some of which we have also written. Critics have been kind, but, more important, children have been enthusiastic both in the United States and in the many foreign countries where our books have been published.

"My fingers finally became itchy to do my own drawings, so I started by retelling and illustrating the stories I loved best as a child. A mini-series of regional American tall tales enabled me to indulge my sense of the absurd. These heros and heroines are offbeat, upbeat, irreverent, hilarious, and a lot of fun to draw. Since I also love research, I delight in taking on nonfiction subjects and handling them with fantasy. Color is the basis of my art, while writing and drawing help to describe my colorful visions.

"Whatever the subject, I want my readers to stretch their imaginations, to see with their minds' eyes what happens between one picture and the next. I want to make them explore and smile.

"I live in New York City with my husband, Claus Dannasch.

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