Hunchback of Notre Dame

Front Cover
Little, Brown, 1888 - 757 pages
6 Reviews
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - doha - LibraryThing

I liked this book but I didn't like the end. it is talk about ugly man his name is Notre-Dame . he had a boring life he lived in the cathedral he cannot live outside it. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - arisak - LibraryThing

This story was very sad story. Quasimodo, the hunchback's life was full of pain, so I hope happy ending, but it was tragic ending. So I felt gloomy when I finished reading it. Read full review

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Selected pages

Contents

I
1
II
23
III
38
IV
48
V
62
VI
73
VII
77
VIII
82

IX
86
X
100
XI
107
XII
111
XIII
139
XIV
153
XV
166
XVI
203
XVII
209
XVIII
217
XIX
228
XX
230
XXI
240
XXII
242
XXIII
258
XXIV
281
XXV
297
XXVI
304
XXVII
334
XXVIII
348
XXIX
1
XXX
23
XXXIX
121
XL
126
XLI
146
XLII
153
XLIII
179
XLIV
196
XLVI
202
XLVII
206
XLVIII
222
XLIX
226
L
231
LI
246
LII
249
LIII
261
LIV
290
LV
335
LVI
337
LVII
341
LVIII
390
LIX
403
LX
405

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Page 164 - Qui verbum meum audit, et credit ei qui misit me, habet vitam aeternam, et in judicium non venit ; sed transit a morte in vitam.
Page 218 - ... for that. They rather mocked at other men. The saints were his friends, and blessed him. The monsters were his friends, and protected him. Thus he had long conversations with them. He would sometimes pass whole hours squatting before one of these statues, in solitary chat with it. If any one came by, he would fly like a lover surprised in his serenade. And the cathedral was not only company for him, it was the universe ; nay, more, it was Nature itself. He never dreamed that there were other...
Page 152 - Val-de-Grace or the Invalides ? Who has stupidly fixed that heavy anachronism of stone into the Carlovingian pavement of Hercandus ? Was it not Louis XIV. fulfilling the vow of Louis XIII? And who has put cold white glass in place of those deep-tinctured panes which made the wandering eyes of our forefathers hesitate between the round window over the grand doorway and the pointed ones of the chancel ? And what would a subchanter of the sixteenth century say could he see that fine...
Page 196 - to observe the fantastic display of lights against the darkness of that gloomy labyrinth of buildings; cast upon it a ray of moonlight, showing the city in glimmering vagueness, with its towers lifting their great heads from that foggy sea.
Page 66 - God knows his visage could attain an intensity of ugliness) acknowledged himself to be outdone. We shall do likewise. We shall not attempt to give the reader an idea of that tetrahedron nose — that horse-shoe mouth — that small left eye overshadowed by a red bushy brow, while the right eye disappeared entirely under an enormous wart — of those straggling teeth with breaches here and there like the battlements of a fortress — of that horny lip, over which one of those teeth projected like...
Page 159 - Roman l zone ; the Gothic zone ; and the zone of the Revival, which we would willingly entitle the Greco-Roman. The Roman stratum, the most ancient and the deepest, is occupied by the circular arch ; which reappears rising from the Grecian column, in the modern and upper stratum of the Revival. The pointed arch is found between the two. The edifices which belong to one or other of these three strata exclusively, are perfectly distinct, uniform, and complete.
Page 296 - The difference was, that here the tenant was alive. The king went and paced slowly round this small edifice, examining it carefully, while Maitre Olivier, following him, read out his paper of expenses aloud: " For making a great wooden cage, of heavy beams, joists, and rafters, measuring inside nine feet long by eight broad, and seven feet high between the planks, mortised and bolted with great iron bolts, which has been fixed in a certain chamber of one of the towers of the Bastille St.

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