Plant Secondary Metabolism

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Springer Science & Business Media, Dec 31, 1998 - Science - 759 pages
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Life has evolved as a unified system; no organism exists similar role also has been suggested for fatty acids from alone, but each is in intimate contact with other organisms cyanolipids. Nonprotein amino acids, cyanogenic glyco and its environment. Historically, it was easier for workers sides, and the non-fatty-acid portion of cyanolipids also are in various disciplines to delimit artificially their respective incorporated into primary metabolites during germination. areas of research, rather than attempt to understand the entire Secondary metabolites of these structural types are accumu system of living organisms. This was a pragmatic and neces lated in large quantities in the seeds of several plant groups sary way to develop an understanding for the various parts. where they probably fulfill an additional function as deter We are now at a point, however, where we need to investi rents to general predation. gate those things common to the parts and, specifically, those The second type of relationship involves interaction of things that unify the parts. The fundamental aspects of many plants with other organisms and with their environment. Bio of these interactions are chemical in nature. Plants constitute logical interactions must be viewed in the light of evolution an essential part of all life systems; phytochemistry provides ary change and the coadaptation, or perhaps coevolution, of a medium for linking several fields of study.
 

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Contents

Acelylenic Compounds
133
2Pyrones Stilbenes
139
1 Flavonoids
201
Tannins
213
Carbohydrates
310
8 Introduction to Terpenes
316
Monoterpenes
322
Iridoid Monoterpenes
337
Pyrrolizidine Quinolizidine
546
Alkaloids Derived from Anthranilic
568
Isoquinoline and Benzylisoquinoline
578
Alkaloids Derived from Both Tyrosine
617
Indole Alkaloids
628
Ergot and Other Indole Alkaloids
655
Alkaloids of Terpenoid Origin
668
Miscellaneous Types of Alkaloids
692

Simple Amines Simple Aromatic
513
Pyrrolidine Tropane Piperidine
531

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About the author (1998)

David Stanley Seigler is a member of the Department of Plant Biology at the University of Illinois, Urbana.

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