Negotium posterorum, pt.II. Index

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Earl St. Germans and private circulation only, 1881 - Great Britain
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Page 84 - Eliot, himself, in the speech given in the appendix to the Fawsley Papers but omitted in the Negotium Posterorum, blames not Buckingham but the Commissioners of the Navy. In reply to the precedent argument about attack on bad counsel of the past May gave one of his epigrammatic speeches : "Let noe man dispise the presidents of antiquitie ; noe man adore them, though they are venerable yet they are noe gods. examples are strong arguments, being proper, but times alter, & wth them oft, their reasons,...
Page 52 - ... or wher ther is contrarietie & dissent may ther be mention of the persons but by periphrasis & description, all bitterness is excluded from their dialect, all words of scandall & aspersion ; noe man may be interrupted in his speech but for transgression of that rule, or breach of some other order...
Page 52 - ... description, all bitterness is excluded from their dialect, all words of scandall & aspersion ; noe man may be interrupted in his speech but for transgression of that rule, or breach of some other order of the house...
Page 5 - Their countenanc in the passage would have dispeld those pirats. Noe charge had been occasiond to the King noe wast of provisions, noe vnreadiness in the ships, noe disorder to the service, but rather an advantage given in all ; yet nothing could be gotten, noe ship might be remov'd, the trade & marchants were neglected, the coast was left vnguarded, the Countrie stood expos'd, as if in expiation of some sinne, it had been made a sacrifice to those monsters."38 This condition of things becoming known...
Page 105 - Granville's was adopted declaring loyalty, affection, and readiness "in a convenient time and in a parliamentary way freely and dutifully to do our utmost endeavor to discover and reforme the abuses and grievances of the realme & state, & in the like sort to afford all necessarie supplie to his most excellent ma vpon his present, & all other his iust occasions & designes."46 The "parliamentarie way
Page 52 - ... order of the house ; in all other things the privileg houlds throughout; the business, as the person has that freedom to pass quietly to the end ; no disparite or odds makes a difference in that course; he that does first stand up, has the first liberty to be heard; the meanest burgess has as much favor as the best knight or counsellor, all sitting in one capacitie of Commoners...
Page 4 - ... of the marchants, the losing of their ships, the interruption of their trade, wch made a generall damp on all things, commodities not being vendible where the transportation is denied ; this made a cry and exclamation that noe part of that countrie did stand free, noe person but was affected...
Page 91 - ... collection was in store to direct the resolution in that case, which thus contained both reason and authority. " Then after giving the speech in the Eliot, not in the Cotton form, he goes on : — This inflamed the affection of the House, and pitched it wholly on the imitation of their fathers ; the clear demonstrations that were made of the likeness of the times gave them like reasons who had like interests and freedom.
Page 54 - ... there might be a reconciliation for himself. Sending the fleet to sea and giving others the command, was propounded as a remedy for the one ; having these reasons to support it, that the design could not be known, nor, if there wanted one, that judged by the success, and the success was answerable but by those that had the action. For the other, it was said that the leaving of...
Page 53 - Eliot adds an outline of the proposal and of its fate. ' The advice he had was, much to endeavour an accommodation with the parliament. The errors most insisted on, were said to be excusable, if retracted. That the disorders of the navy might be imputed to the officers. That the want of counsels might be satisfied by a free admission to the board: The greatest difficulty was conceived to rest in religion and the fleet: for the first, the jealousy being derived from his protection given to...

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