The Good Man Jesus and the Scoundrel Christ

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Knopf Canada, Nov 2, 2010 - Brothers - 256 pages
15 Reviews

This is a story. In this ingenious and spellbinding retelling of the life of Jesus, Philip Pullman revisits the most influential story ever told. Charged with mystery, compassion and enormous power, The Good Man Jesus and the Scoundrel Christ throws fresh light on who Jesus was and asks the reader questions that will continue to resonate long after the final page is turned. For, above all, this book is about how stories become stories.




From the Hardcover edition.
 

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Review: The Good Man Jesus and the Scoundrel Christ

User Review  - Nicole Sweeney - Goodreads

There is no way for me to get around mentioning HDM when I review this book, so I'm not going to try: The controversy surrounding HDM continues to annoy me, because as far as I'm concerned, anyone who ... Read full review

Review: The Good Man Jesus and the Scoundrel Christ

User Review  - Manny - Goodreads

The night after his book was published, Philip dreamed that he met Jesus. He was dressed all in white, sitting at a table on which there was a bottle of wine, two glasses and a copy of Philip's novel ... Read full review

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About the author (2010)

PHILIP PULLMAN was born in Norwich on 19th October 1946. The early part of his life was spent travelling all over the world, because his father and then his stepfather were both in the Royal Air Force. He spent part of his childhood in Australia, where he first met the wonders of comics, and grew to love Superman and Batman in particular. After he left school he went to Exeter College, Oxford, to read English. He did a number of odd jobs for a while, and then moved back to Oxford to become a teacher. He taught at various middle schools for twelve years, and then moved to Westminster College, Oxford, to be a part-time lecturer. He taught courses on the Victorian novel and on the folk tale, and also a course examining how words and pictures fit together. He eventually left teaching in order to write full time. Philip lives in Oxford, and he writes in a shed at the bottom of his garden. The shed contains two comfortable chairs (one for writing in, one for sitting at the computer in), several hundred books, a six-foot-long stuffed rat which took a part in his play Sherlock Holmes and the Limehouse Horror, a guitar, a saxophone, as well as the computer, decorated with dozens of brightly coloured artificial flowers attached to it by Blu-Tack.


From the Hardcover edition.

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