The cabinet history of England: being an abridgment, by the author, of the chapters entitled "Civil and military history" in "The pictorial history of England," with a continuation to the present time, Volumes 19-20

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C. Knight & Co., 1846 - Great Britain
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Page 79 - I can assure those gentlemen, that it is a much easier and less distressing thing to draw remonstrances in a comfortable room by a good fireside, than to occupy a cold bleak hill, and sleep under frost and snow, without clothes or blankets.
Page 46 - German despot ; your attempts will be for ever vain and impotent — doubly so, indeed, from this mercenary aid on which you rely; for it irritates, to an incurable resentment, the minds of your adversaries, to overrun them with the mercenary sons of rapine and plunder, devoting them and their possessions to the rapacity of hireling cruelty. If I were an American, as I am an Englishman, while a foreign troop was landed in my country, I never would lay down my arms : Never, never, never...
Page 46 - ... of the woods; to delegate to the merciless Indian the defence of disputed rights, and to wage the horrors of his barbarous war against our brethren ? My lords, these enormities cry aloud for redress and punishment.
Page 128 - Sulivan, then deputy-chairman of the court of directors, moved in his place in the House of Commons for leave to bring in a bill " for the better regulation of the affairs of the East India Company and of their servants in India, and for the due administration of justice in Bengal.
Page 138 - That Robert Lord Clive did at the same time render " great and meritorious services to his country.
Page 213 - It is agreed that the Congress shall earnestly recommend it to the legislatures of the respective, states, to provide for the restitution of all estates, rights and properties, which have been confiscated, belonging to real British subjects...
Page 40 - The Life of Robert Lord Clive ; collected from the Family Papers, communicated by the Earl of Powis.
Page 66 - Shall a people, that seventeen years ago was the terror of the world, now stoop so low as to tell its ancient inveterate enemy, take all we have, only give us peace ? It is impossible ! ' I wage war with no man, or set of men.
Page 31 - The truth is," says one of the greatest authorities hi Indian affairs, " that, from the day on which the company's troops marched one mile from their factories, the increase of their territories and their armies became' a principle of self-preservation...
Page 213 - The navigation of the river Mississippi from its source to the ocean, shall forever remain free and open to the subjects of Great Britain and the citizens of the United States.

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