Louisiana: a Sketch in Outline of Its Past and Present: An Introduction to the Study of Louisiana History

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F.F. Hansell, 1897 - Louisiana - 91 pages
 

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Page 43 - ... territory again,1 and once more by occupancy and possession did she hold what had once been hers by discovery and exploration. Many honors were bestowed upon Galvez. He was commissioned a Lieutenant-General, decorated with the cross of Knight Pensioner, and made a Count. He was appointed, successively, Governor of Louisiana; CaptainGeneral of Louisiana and Florida; Governor-General of Cuba, the Floridas and Louisiana ; and Viceroy of Mexico. With a record achieved by few of his years, he died...
Page 62 - ... 1868-70. state increased from $6,000,000. to $25,021,000. The cost to the state for four years of this misrule amounted to the sum of $106,020,337. Crushed by their late defeat the best people of Louisiana could interpose or organize little opposition. Appeals to the ballot-box...
Page 62 - North had come and gone, but the hangers-on that flock like wolves and vultures in the rear of advancing hosts remained.
Page 15 - ... what De Narvaez had failed to do. The story of his memorable march has often been told. It is a tale of dogged determination of purpose on the part of the commander, of unswerving loyalty on the part of his men. It is a narrative of endurance, courage, and fortitude, of disaster, pathos, and tragedy. North, to the mountains of North Georgia; southwest, through the length of Alabama to the Indian town of Mauvilla,1 where was waged their greatest battle; north-westward, diagonally across the present...
Page 16 - ... region about the shores of the great lakes. Among the first to come to the hither side and enter what is now the territory of the United States were Nicollet, Marquette, Joliet, Allouez, Hennepin, Du Luth Tonti, La Salle, and others, whose names are made familiar to us in the chronicles of earlier explorations. From their Indian friends, the pioneers of New France learned of the great western river flowing southward, now known as the Mississippi. Marquette and Joliet made their way to this river...
Page 15 - ... fit place among the nightmares of history. The Mississippi river was crossed a little below the site upon which now stands Memphis. It is probable that the Missouri line was reached before the invaders undertook to return. Slowly they made their way southward, their number lessening day by day. Soon they reached what is now north-eastern Louisiana. Here, amid the glooms of swamp and river bottoms, beset by vengeful foes, a remnant of the band gathered about their leader. Stubborn old soldier...
Page 16 - ... north-east Florida, and built St. Augustine, and this right went unquestioned until the year 1699. II. — FRENCH OCCUPANCY. In the sixty years following the founding of Quebec (1608), the forerunners of French civilization in America reached the region about the shores of the great lakes. Among the first to come to the hither side and enter what is now the territory of the United States were Nicollet, Marquette, Joliet, Allouez, Hennepin, Du Luth Tonti, La Salle, and others, whose names are...
Page 9 - Louisiana of struggle;1 a province passing from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, and in the passing occupying the attention of some of the most adroit of European...

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