Memoirs of Great Britain and Ireland: from the dissolution of the last Parliament of Charles II till the capture of the French and Spanish fleets at Vigo : a new edition, in three volumes; ...

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A. Strahan, and T. Cadell, 1790 - Great Britain
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Page 50 - I ought to keep myself out of it. Let them please themselves with making the king glorious, who think a whole people may justly be sacrificed for the interest and pleasure of one man, and a few of his followers ; let them rejoice in their...
Page 50 - I shall die in the same principles in which I have lived, and will live no longer than they can preserve me. I have in my life been guilty of many follies ; but, as I think, of no meanness.
Page 37 - Army corrupted, the people enslaved ; all things vendible, no man safe, but by such evil and infamous means as flattery and bribery ; what joy can I have in my own country in this condition ? Is it a pleasure to see that all I love in the world is sold and destroyed ? Shall I renounce all my old principles, learn the vile...
Page 37 - I confess, we are naturally inclined to delight in our own country, and I have a particular love to mine. I hope I have given some testimony of it. I think that being exiled from it is a great evil, and would redeem myself from it with the loss of a great deal of my blood. But when that country of mine, which used to be esteemed a paradise, is now like to be made a stage of injury ; the liberty which we hoped to...
Page 349 - Mr. Sidney has been of great use to me on many occasions. He is a man who was in the first wars, and who is naturally an enemy to the Court.
Page 165 - I am going to tell you the greatest secret in the world, and my head would be in danger if it was known. The king of England at the bottom of his heart is a Catholic; but he is surrounded with Protestant bishops, and nobody tells him his condition nor speaks to him of God.
Page 97 - The lord king of Great Britain, being convinced of the truth of the Catholic religion, and resolved to declare it and reconcile himself with the Church of Rome as soon as the welfare of his kingdom will permit...
Page 132 - All that is true, but it is as true, that if I do not take his life, he will soon have mine,' — which would admit of no reply.
Page 38 - ... a dear price paid for that which is not worth keeping, nor the life that is accompanied with it.
Page 53 - Sidney aimed at the deftruftion of monarchy, and on its ruins to found that republic, which in imagination he adored. Monmouth hoped, amidft public diftraftions, to pave a way for himfelf to the tlarone.

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