Democracy and modernity: international colloquium on the centenary of David Ben-Gurion [by the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities, held in Jerusalem, on January 4 - 5, 1987]

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Shmuel Noah Eisenstadt
BRILL, 1992 - Social Science - 169 pages
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"Democracy and Modernity" presents a colloquium of scholars on the present state of democracy in many parts of the globe, in both developed and developing countries. Where does it stand firm, and where is it on shifting ground? What are the conditions necessary for the consolidation of democracy, and what difficulties face those countries where a stable democratic regime is still a hope for the future? How do the political traditions of a country's past affect its ability to maintain democracy in the present? Recent changes in the nature of regimes in many previously non-democratic countries have made these questions all the more timely. The example of other countries that have made the shift from non-democratic or pre-democratic to democratic regimes in the recent past will surely prove relevant to those encountering a similar complex of problems today. Contributions to the volume include those of Seymour Martin Lipset, on conditions of the democratic order and social change; Ralf Dahrendorf, on the European experience; Shlomo Avineri, responding to Lipset and Dahrendorf; Shlomo Ben Ami, on Southern Europe; Carlo Rossetti, on the rule of law; Luis Roniger, on the consolidation of democracy in Southern Europe and Latin America; Myron Weiner, On India; Erik Cohen, on Thailand; Ben-Ami Shillony, on the political tradition of Japan; Naomi Chazan, on Africa; and Metin Heper, on the Turkish case. The Introduction and Concluding Remarks by S.N. Eisenstadt set the individual presentations within the time-frame of global developments since World War II and within the comprehensive context of the political culture of the modern state.
 

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Contents

Notes on the European
15
The Concept of Southern Europe and the New Mediterranean
23
A Historical
36
Conditions for the Consolidation of Democracy in Southern
53
Violent Social Conflict and Democratic
69
Thai Democracy as National Symbol and Political Practice
86
The Political Tradition of Japan and its Impact on
103
Africa s Quest for Democracy
111
The Turkish Case
142
Concluding Observations
164
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About the author (1992)

Seymour Martin Lipset: March 18, 1922 - December 31, 2006 American political theorist and sociologist, Seymour Martin Lipset, was born in New York City on March 18, 1922, and educated at City College of New York and Columbia University. Lipset taught at a number of universities, including the University of Toronto, Columbia University, the University of California at Berkeley, Harvard University, and Stanford University. A senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, he was also a member of the International Society of Political Psychology, the American Political Science Association, and the American Academy of Science. Among Lipset's many works are "Political Man: The Social Bases of Politics" (1960), "Class, Status, and Power" (1953), and "Revolution and Counterrevolution" (1968). He also contributed articles to a number of magazines, including The New Republic, Encounter, and Commentary. Lipset has received a number of awards for his work, including the MacIver Award in 1962, the Gunnar Myrdal Prize in 1970, and the Townsend Harris Medal in 1971. Lipset died on December 31, 2006, as a result of complications following a stroke. He was 84.

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