Introduction to Husserlian Phenomenology

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Northwestern University Press, Apr 29, 1993 - Philosophy - 269 pages
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This comprehensive study of Husserl's phenomenology concentrates on Husserl's emphasis on the theory of knowledge. The authors develop a synthetic overview of phenomenology and its relation to logic, mathematics, the natural and human sciences, and philosophy. The result is an example of philology at its best, avoiding technical language and making Husserl's thought accessible to a variety of readers.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Mathematics Logic and Phenomenology
13
The Methodical Founding of Phenomenology as the Science
58
The Universal Structures of Consciousness in
88
Perception Thing and Space
115
The Phenomenology of Intuitional Presentiation
141
Judgement and Truth
166
Static and Genetic Constitution
195
The I and the Person
205
The Lifeworld Both as a Problem Concerning
217
First and Second Philosophy or Transcendental
229
Appendix
235
Notes
251
Bibliography
267
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About the author (1993)

RUDOLF BERNET is professor of philosophy at the University of Louvain and a member of the board of directors of the Husserl Archives.



ISO KERN is senior reader at the University of Bern and editor of Husserliana XIII-XV.



EDUARD MARBACH is senior reader in philosophy at the University of Bern and editor of Husserliana XXIII.

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