Disputed Questions

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Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 1985 - Religion - 297 pages
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"Reflecting Thomas Merton's lifelong examination of the relationship between the monastic, contemplative life and the need for spiritual expression in the secular world, these essays explore the coming together of the active and the contemplative life and the relationship of persons to social organizations. Ranging from an account of the Greek monastic community on Mount Athos to a look at the spiritually destructive power of racism, Merton's writing manages to be both lively and profound as he leads the reader through the hard questions of modern existence, bringing together traditional religious values with a concern for the spiritual needs of the present day.".--cover matter.
 

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Essays covers the roots of the Carmelite order, current (1960) political issues, "The Pasternak Affair," "Philosophy of Solitude." Read full review

Contents

THE PASTERNAK AFFAIR
3
MOUNT ATHOS
68
THE SPIRITUALITY OF SINAI
83
THE POWER AND MEANING OF LOVE
97
CHRISTIANITY AND TOTALITARIANISM
127
SACRED ART AND THE SPIRITUAL LIFE
151
Blessed Paul Giustiniani
165
PHILOSOPHY OF SOLITUDE
177
The Ascetic Doctrine
208
THE PRIMITIVE CARMELITE IDEAL
218
ABSURDITY IN SACRED DECORATION
264
MONK AND APOSTLE
274
APPENDIX A
291
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About the author (1985)

Thomas Merton (1915-1968) was born in France and came to live in the United States at the age of 24. He received several awards recognizing his contribution to religious study and contemplation, including the Pax Medal in 1963, and remained a devoted spiritualist and a tireless advocate for social justice until his death in 1968. The Sign of Jonas was originally published in 1953.

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