Political Essay on the Kingdom of New Spain, Volume 3

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1814
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Page 117 - Señor, que tiene cuidado, y siempre lo ha tenido, de proveer en la mayor prisa, que topé entre los naturales de una provincia que se dice Tachco, ciertas piecezuelas de ello, a manera de moneda muy delgada, y procediendo por mi pesquisa, hallé que en la dicha provincia, y aun en otras, se trataba por moneda...
Page 246 - America to work in the gold and silver mines. The mines of Siberia have been peopled by Russian malefactors; but in the Spanish colonies this species of punishment has been fortunately unknown for centuries. The Mexican miner is the best paid of all miners; he gains at the least from...
Page 73 - They plant their nopaleries in cleared ground on the slopes of mountains or ravines two or three leagues distant from their villages; and when properly cleaned, the plants are in a condition to maintain the cochineal in the third year.
Page 452 - Such principles as prescribe the rooting up the vine and the olive, are not calculated to favour manufactures. A colony has for ages, been only considered as useful to the parent state, in so far as it supplied a great number of raw materials, and consumed a number of the commodities carried there by the ships of the mother country. It was easy for different commercial nations to adapt their colonial system to islands of small extent, ur factories established on the coast of a continent.
Page 50 - Arab race ; they wander wild in herds, in the savannahs of the Provincias Internas. The exportation of these horses to Natchez and New Orleans, becomes every year of greater importance. Many Mexican families possess in their Hatos de ganado, from thirty to forty thousand head of horses and oxen. The mules would be still more numerous, if so many of them did not perish on the highways from the excessive fatigues of journeys of several months.
Page 93 - How could they be found in a country, where, according to the ideas of the common people, all that is necessary to happiness, is bananas, salted flesh, a hammock, and a guitar? The hope of gain is too weak a stimulus, under a zone, where beneficent nature provides to man a thousand means of procuring an easy and peaceful existence without quitting his country, and without struggling with the monsters of the ocean.
Page 111 - I was presented with gold plate and jewels of such precious workmanship, that unwilling to allow them to be melted, I set apart more than a hundred thousand ducats worth of them to be presented to your Imperial Highness. These objects were of the greatest beauty, and I doubt if any other prince on earth ever possessed anything similar to them.
Page 8 - ... almost all the Mexican sugar is manufactured by Indians and consequently by free hands. It is -easy to foresee that the small West India Islands, notwithstanding their favourable position for trade, will not be long able to sustain a competition with the continental colonies, if the latter continue to give themselves up with the same ardour to the cultivation of sugar, coffee and cotton.
Page 459 - On visiting these workshops, a traveller is disagreeably struck, not only with the great imperfection of the technical process in the preparation for dyeing, but in a particular manner also with the unhealthiness of the situation, and the bad treatment to which the workmen are exposed. Free men, Indians, and people of colour, are confounded with the criminals distributed by justice among the manufactories, in order to be compelled to work.
Page 111 - These objects were of the greatest beauty, and I doubt if any other prince of earth ever possessed any thing similar to them. That your highness may not imagine I am advancing fables, I add, that all which the earth and ocean produces, of which king Montezuma could have any knowledge, he had caused to be imitated in gold and silver, in precious stones, and feathers, and the whole in such great perfection, that one could not help believing he saw the very objects represented.

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