A Treatise on the Theory and Practice of Landscape Gardening: Adapted to North America; with a View to the Improvement of Country Residences. Comprising Historical Notices and General Principles of the Art, Directions for Laying Out Grounds and Arranging Plantations, the Description and Cultivation of Hardy Trees, Decorative Accompaniments to the House and Grounds, the Formation of Pieces of Artificial Water, Flower Gardens, Etc. With Remarks on Rural Architecture

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G. P. Putnam; London, Longman, Brown, Green & Longmans, 1849 - Landscape gardening - 532 pages
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Page 29 - I, for my part, do not like images cut out in juniper or other garden stuff; they be for children.
Page 30 - The Tower of Babel, not yet finished. St. George in box : his arm scarce long enough, but will be in a condition to stick the dragon by next April. A green dragon of the same, with a tail of ground-ivy for the present.
Page 408 - ... throw in a semblance of green summer to cheer the fire-side : all these bespeak the influence of taste, flowing down from high sources, and pervading the lowest levels of the public mind. If ever Love, as poets sing, delights to visit a cottage, it must be the cottage of an English peasant.
Page 85 - Consult the genius of the place in all: That tells the waters or to rise or fall; Or helps the ambitious hill the heavens to scale, Or scoops in circling theatres the vale ; Calls in the country, catches opening glades, Joins willing woods, and varies shades from shades; Now breaks, or now directs, the intending lines; Paints, as you plant, and, as you work, designs.
Page 173 - ... ambrosial amber of the hive, yet leave this barren spot to me, spare, woodman, spare the beechen tree, thrice twenty summers I have seen the sky grow bright, the forest green ; and many a wintry wind have stood in bloomless, fruitless solitude, since childhood in my...
Page 406 - The taste of the English in the cultivation of land and in what is called landscape gardening is unrivalled. They have studied Nature intently, and discover an exquisite sense of her beautiful forms and harmonious combinations. Those charms which in other countries she lavishes in wild solitudes are here assembled round the haunts of domestic life.
Page i - Landscape Gardening, Adapted to North America; with a View to the Improvement of Country Residences. Comprising Historical Notices and General Principles of the Art, Directions for Laying Out Grounds and Arranging Plantations, the Description and Cultivation of Hardy Trees, Decorative Accompaniments to the House and Grounds, the Formation of Pieces of Artificial Water, Flower Gardens, etc. with Remarks on Rural Architecture.
Page 406 - Nothing can be more imposing than the magnificence of English park scenery. Vast lawns that extend like sheets of vivid green, with here and there clumps of gigantic trees heaping up rich piles of foliage; the solemn pomp of groves and woodland glades with the deer trooping in silent herds across them...
Page 296 - Behold, the Assyrian was a cedar in Lebanon with fair branches, and with a shadowing shroud, and of an high stature; and his top was among the thick boughs.
Page 30 - Queen Elizabeth in Myrtle, which was very forward, but miscarried by being too near a Savine. An old Maid of Honour in Wormwood. A topping Ben Jonson in Laurel. Divers eminent modern Poets in Bays, somewhat blighted, to be disposed of a pennyworth. A quick-set Hog shot up into a Porcupine, by being forgot a week in rainy weather.

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