The Young McKinley: Or, School-days in Ohio; a Tale of Old Times on the Western Reserve

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D. Appleton, 1905 - Ohio - 307 pages
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Page 19 - Here, in the body pent, Absent from Him I roam ; Yet nightly pitch my moving tent A day's march nearer home.
Page 300 - A system which provides a mutual exchange of commodities is manifestly essential to the continued and healthful growth of our export trade. We must not repose in fancied security that we can forever sell everything and buy little or nothing.
Page 195 - That withers away to let others succeed; So the multitude comes, even those we behold, To repeat every tale that has often been told. For we are the same our fathers have been ; We see the same sights our fathers have seen, — We drink the same stream and view the same sun, And run the same course our fathers have run.
Page 195 - tis the draught of a breath — From the blossom of health to the paleness of death, From the gilded saloon to the bier and the shroud : — Oh! why should the spirit of mortal be proud?
Page 194 - The hand of the king, that the sceptre hath borne, The brow of the priest, that the mitre hath worn, The eye of the sage, and the heart of the brave, Are hidden and lost in the depths of the grave.
Page 195 - So the multitude goes, like the flowers or the weed That withers away to let others succeed; So the multitude comes, even those we behold, To repeat every tale that has often been told. For we are the same our fathers have been; We see the same sights our fathers have seen— We drink the same stream and view the same sun, And run the same course our fathers have run.
Page 195 - And make in their dwelling a transient abode, Meet the things that they met on their pilgrimage road.
Page 194 - Oh! why should the spirit of mortal be proud?— . Like a swift-fleeting meteor, a fast-flying cloud, A flash of the lightning, a break of the wave, He passeth from life to his rest in the grave. The leaves of the oak and the willow shall fade, Be scattered around, and together be laid; And the young and the old, and the low and the high, Shall moulder to dust, and together shall lie.
Page 299 - My fellow citizens, trade statistics , indicate that this country is in a state of unexampled prosperity. The figures are almost appalling. They show that we are utilizing our fields and forests and mines and that we are furnishing profitable employment to the millions of workingmen throughout the United States, bringing comfort and happiness to their homes and making it possible to lay by savings for old age and disability. "That all the people are participating in this great prosperity is seen...
Page 212 - ... and among these they had worked their way, leaping from one narrow point to another, rarely making a false step, and giving us no occasion to dismount. Having divested ourselves of every unnecessary encumbrance, we commenced the ascent. This time, like experienced...

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