The Lives of All the Earls and Dukes of Devonshire: Descended from the Renowned Sir William Cavendish, One of the Privy Counsellors to King Henry VIII, to which is Added, a Short Account of the Rise, Progress, and Present State of the High Court of Chancery

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author and sold, 1764 - 492 pages
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Page 259 - A man so various that he seemed to be Not one, but all mankind's epitome : Stiff in opinions, always in the wrong, Was everything by starts and nothing long; But in the course of one revolving moon Was chymist, fiddler, statesman, and buffoon ; Then all for women, painting, rhyming, drinking, Besides ten thousand freaks that died in thinking.
Page 83 - A daring pilot in extremity; Pleas'd with the danger when the waves went high, He sought the storms; but, for a calm unfit, Would steer too nigh the sands to boast his wit.
Page 259 - Besides ten thousand freaks that died in thinking. Blest madman, who could every hour employ With something new to wish or to enjoy ! Railing and praising were his usual themes, And both, to show his judgment, in extremes : So over violent or over civil That every man with him was God or Devil.
Page 151 - Law they require, let law then show her face; They could not be content to look on grace, Her hinder parts, but with a daring eye To tempt the terror of her front, and die. By their own arts 'tis righteously decreed, Those dire artificers of death shall bleed.
Page 83 - Refuse his age the needful hours of rest? Punish a body which he could not please, Bankrupt of life, yet prodigal of ease? And all to leave what with his toil he won To that unfeathered two-legged thing, a son, Got, while his soul did huddled notions try, And born a shapeless lump, like anarchy.
Page vii - Go ! if your ancient, but ignoble blood Has crept through scoundrels ever since the flood, Go ! and pretend your family is young, Nor own your fathers have been fools so long. What can ennoble sots, or slaves, or cowards ? Alas ! not all the blood of all the Howards. Look next on greatness : say where greatness lies, Where, but among the heroes and the wise...
Page 260 - In the worst inn's worst room, with mat half-hung, The floors of plaster, and the walls of dung, On once a flock-bed, but repair'd with straw, With tape-tied curtains, never meant to draw, The George and Garter dangling from that bed Where tawdry yellow strove with dirty red, Great Villiers lies — alas!
Page vii - But by your father's worth, if your's you rate, Count me those only who were good and great. Go ! if your ancient, but ignoble blood Has crept through scoundrels, ever since the flood, Go ! and pretend your family is young; Nor own your fathers have been fools so long. What can ennoble sots, or slaves, or cowards, Alas ! not all the blood of all the Howards.
Page 149 - Is one that would by law supplant his prince ; The people's brave, the politician's tool ; Never was patriot yet, but was a fool.
Page 148 - So willing to forgive the offending age; So much the father did the king assuage. But now so far my clemency they slight, The offenders question my forgiving right: That one was made for many, they contend; But 'tis to rule; for that's a monarch's end. They call my tenderness of blood, my fear: Though manly tempers can the longest bear. Yet, since they will divert my native course, Tis time to show I am not good by force.

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