Queen Elizabeth

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Wildside Press, 2008 - Biography & Autobiography - 228 pages
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Jacob Abbott (1803-1879) was an American writer of children's books. His Rollo books, such as "Rollo at Work," "Rollo at Play," and "Rollo in Europe," are the best known of his writings.

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About the author (2008)

Jacob Abbott (1803-79) was a prolific American author, writing juvenile fiction, brief histories, biographies, religious books for the general reader, and a few works in popular science. He wrote 180 books and was a coauthor or editor of 31 more

Publius Flavius Vegetius Renatus, commonly referred to simply as Vegetius, was a writer of the Later Roman Empire (late 4th century). Nothing is known of his life or station beyond what he tells us in his two surviving works: "Epitoma rei militaris" (also referred to as "De Re Militari"), and the lesser-known "Digesta Artis Mulomedicinae", a guide to veterinary medicine.

John Stevens Cabot Abbott (1805-77), an American historian, pastor, and pedagogical writer, was born in Brunswick, Maine to Jacob and Betsey Abbott.

Field Marshal Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, KG GCB GCH PC FRS (1 May 1769 - 14 September 1852), was an Anglo-Irish soldier and statesman, a native of Ireland belonging to the Protestant Ascendancy, and one of the leading military and political figures of 19th-century Britain. His defeat of Napoleon at Waterloo in 1815 put him in the top rank of Britain's military heroes. In 2002 he was number 15 in the BBC's poll of the 100 Greatest Britons.

Theodore Roosevelt (October 27, 1858 - January 6, 1919), often referred to by his initials TR, was an American statesman, author, explorer, soldier, naturalist, and historian who served as the 26th President of the United States. A leader of the Republican Party, he was the spokesman for the Progressive Era. A sickly child whose asthma was debilitating and nearly fatal, Roosevelt regained his vigor, and embraced a strenuous life. He integrated his exuberant personality, vast range of interests, and world-famous achievements into a "cowboy" persona defined by its exultant masculinity. Home-schooled, he became a lifelong naturalist at an early age. Roosevelt attended Harvard College, where he studied biology, boxed, and developed an interest in naval affairs. His first of many books, "The Naval War of 1812" (1882), established his reputation as both a learned historian and a popular writer.

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