John Kenneth Galbraith: The Economist as Political Theorist

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Rowman & Littlefield, Jan 1, 2006 - Business & Economics - 325 pages
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John Kenneth Galbraith: The Economist as Political Theorist is a comprehensive analysis of John Kenneth Galbraith's political economy, placing him within the development and evolution of twentieth century American liberalism. This book examines the continuing link between politics and economics in American political discourse by locating Galbraith in a framework of liberal and conservative theory, controversy, alternatives, and policy. By analyzing Galbraith's complex arguments, Waligorski addresses important issues about the content and nature of American political thought and policy conflict including freedom, equality, inequality, individualism, democracy, the legitimate role of government, the nature of a good society, the structure of modern capitalism, and the failure of contemporary economic theory to serve as a guide to a better life. Many of the issues that drive contemporary politics today are simultaneously political, economic, and ideological. As an economist, political theorist, and cultural critic, Galbraith epitomizes this interconnection."
 

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Contents

Themes and Problems
1
Disguising Reality Critique of Ideological Thinking in Political Economy
31
Rethinking Liberal Values Power and Political Economics
67
Equality and the Proper Liberal
97
A Liberal Critique of Liberal Freedom
121
Galbraith and the Economic Debate over Democracy
145
A Role for Government
173
A Good Society Individuality Community and Social Balance
215
Galbraith and American Liberalism
251
Bibliography
291
Index
315
About the Author
325
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About the author (2006)

Conrad Waligorski is professor of political science at the University of Arkansas.

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