Justice and the Genesis of War

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Cambridge University Press, Aug 10, 1995 - History - 356 pages
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Studies of the causes of war generally presuppose a "realist" account of motivation: when statesmen choose to wage war, they do so for purposes of self-preservation or self-aggrandizement. In this book, however, David Welch argues that humans are motivated by normative concerns, the pursuit of which may result in behavior inconsistent with self-interest. He examines the effect of one particular type of normative motivation - the justice motive - in the outbreak of the five Great Power wars: the Crimean War, the Franco-Prussian War, World War I, World War II, and the Falklands War. Realist theory would suggest that these wars would be among the least likely to be influenced by considerations other than power and interest, but the author demonstrates that the justice motive played an important role in the genesis of war, and that its neglect by theorists of international politics is a major oversight. Since states are often led to war by the perceived demands of justice, Welch concludes the book by examining the meaning of justice across borders with an eye to clarifying its relationship to international order. He argues that there is room for creative institution-building in the pursuit of a just world order, but that the current gap between empirical and normative political science makes progress toward this goal difficult.
 

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Contents

THE JUSTICE MOTIVE AND WAR
7
WAR AS A DECISIONMAKING PROBLEM
9
REALISM AND MOTIVATION
10
THE JUSTICE MOTIVE
18
THE POTENTIAL CONTRIBUTION OF THE JUSTICE MOTIVE TO DECISION THEORY
22
SOME HYPOTHESES ON THE AGENCY OF THE JUSTICE MOTIVE
30
PROBING THE AGENCY AND RELATIVE IMPORTANCE OF THE JUSTICE MOTIVE
32
SOME OBJECTIONS ANTICIPATED
40
WORLD WAR II
127
THE ROLE OF ADOLF HITLER
129
HITLERS AIMS
131
HITLERS RISE TO POWER
135
PUBLIC SUPPORT FOR HITLERS PROGRAM
139
THE LULLING EFFECT OF THE SENSE OF JUSTICE
141
THE APPROACH TO WAR
147
CONCLUSIONS
153

THE CRIMEAN WAR
48
BACKGROUND
49
RUSSIAN MOTIVATIONS
58
ALLIED MOTIVATIONS
68
CONCLUSIONS
73
THE FRANCOPRUSSIAN WAR
76
THE SETTING
77
THE COMING OF THE WAR
81
FRENCH AND PRUSSIAN GOALS
86
RETROSPECT AND PROSPECT
92
WORLD WAR I
95
THE RISE OF GERMANY
97
ALSACELORRAINE
102
SERBIAN NATIONALISM
106
SARAJEVO AND AFTER
112
CONCLUSIONS
125
THE FALKLANDSMALVINAS WAR
155
THE NATURE OF THE DISPUTE
156
THE ARGENTINE DECISION TO INVADE
163
SOME FINAL THOUGHTS
184
JUSTICE AND INJUSTICE IN A GLOBAL CONTEXT
186
JUSTICE AND ORDER
192
THE PROBLEM OF MORAL DIVERSITY
194
JUSTICE AND JUSTIFICATION
197
JUSTICE BEYOND BORDERS
200
TOWARD A JUST WORLD ORDER
210
SOME FINAL THOUGHTS
214
CONCLUSION
217
NOTES
220
BIBLIOGRAPHY
309
INDEX
328
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Page viii - Since morals, therefore, have an influence on the actions and affections, it follows that they cannot be derived from reason; and that because reason alone, as we have already proved, can never have any such influence. Morals excite passions, and produce or prevent actions. Reason of itself is utterly impotent in this particular. The rules of morality, therefore, are not conclusions of our reason.

References to this book

The Ethics of War
A. J. Coates
Limited preview - 1997
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