Reconstruction in Georgia: Economic, Social, Political, 1865-1872, Volume 64, Issue 1

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Columbia University Press, 1915 - Reconstruction - 418 pages
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Contents

War politics
31
Condition of Georgia at the close of the war
40
CHAPTER II
42
The negro enjoying freedom
43
Migration of negroes
44
Care of destitute freedmen
47
Control of vagrancy
49
Rumor of insurrection
50
Question of labor
52
Attitude of white people toward emancipation
53
Improved labor situation in 1866
54
Negroes in towns
56
Freedmen on the Sea Islands
57
Report of General Steedman and General Fullerton
58
Experience of Frances Butler Leigh
60
General Tillson of the Freedmens Bureau
61
Criticism of the Freedmens Bureau
63
Address of H V Johnson before the Convention
66
Labor and Land 1 Attempt of planters to continue the old system
68
Supervision of labor contracts
69
Conditions in Southwest Georgia
70
Wages in 1865
73
Standard of wages set by the Freedmens Bureau
75
Labor troubles
78
Negro land owners
79
Negro tenants
80
The negro family as an industrial unit
82
Exodus of negro women from field labor
83
Failure of crops in 18651866
85
Credit system
87
Beginning of the breakup of plantations
88
Emigration and immigration
92
The revision of colonial laws 9396
93
CHAPTER IV
95
Cotton prices
97
Business in cities and towns
98
Resurrection of Atlanta
99
Effect of the charter limitations of Massachusetts and Pennsylvania
100
Columbus
101
Augusta
102
Macon Athens Milledgeville
103
Manufactures
104
Repair of railroads
105
Procedure in the review of private laws
106
Banking
110
Attitude toward colonial imposts m
112
CHAPTER V
116
Shifting in social classes
118
Education
119
First commonschool law
121
University of Georgia
122
Attitude of Georgians toward Northerners
127
Race relations
129
Social disorder
131
Laws declaring slaves personal property
134
CHAPTER VI
136
Political Reorganization
137
Military rule
140
Attitude toward laws technically defective 141147
141
Provisional government
144
Attitude toward acts conflicting with a more fundamental law 147150
147
Appointment of Provisional Governor Johnson
152
Reorganized state government
153
Election of United States Senators
154
Ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment
156
Freedmens Code Commission
158
Attitude of Georgia people toward Presidential Reconstruction
160
Attitude toward deviations from English judicial procedure 161168
161
Summary 18651866
165
PART IIMILITARY AND POLITICAL RECON STRUCTION 18671872
169
CHAPTER VII
171
Letter of exGovernor Brown
172
Military rule under General Pope
175
Laws detrimental to the dignity or privilege of the crown 176193
176
Newspaper and Jury Orders
177
Removal of General Pope
178
Military rule under General Meade
179
Relation of military to civil authority
180
Differences between General Meade and Governor Bullock
183
Registration
186
Constitutional Convention 18671868
188
Personnel of the Convention
189
Question of eligibility of members
208
Election of United States Senators
209
Expulsion of negroes from the legislature
211
Democratic Conservative Party
213
Personnel of the reconstruction government
216
The proportion of laws disallowed
221
Influence of exGovernor Brown
223
CHAPTER IX
226
Expenses
227
Bonds
229
Repudiation
234
State aid to railroads
235
Brunswick and Albany R R
237
Corrupt management of the Western and Atlantic R R
238
Investigating committees
244
Lease of the Western and Atlantic R R
245
Organization of the leasing company
247
Question of the fairness of the lease
251
CHAPTER X
255
Conditions in Georgia
257
Ratification of the Fifteenth Amendment
260
Reorganization
262
Terrys Purge
264
Toombss views on the reorganization of the legislature
265
Attempt at prolongation of Republican control
267
PAGE
268
Final admission of Georgia February 1871
269
Restoration of home rule
270
Democratic victory in the state election December 1870
271
Investigation by Democratic committees
272
ECONOMIC PROGRESS AND SOCIAL CHANGES
277
CHAPTER XI
279
Agriculture 18671872
281
Loss in land values
283
Labor supply
289
Methods of cultivation and employment
290
Process of disintegration of the plantation
293
Rates of wages
295
Negro labor convention
297
Effect of politics on labor
298
Decrease in other agricultural products
303
CHAPTER XII
305
Increase in some industries
306
Lumber
308
Industrial labor
309
Railroads
310
Central R R System
311
Georgia R R and others
315
Enterprises of H I Kimball
320
Banks
324
Trade
326
City growth
328
Savannah
330
Macon 33
331
CHAPTER XIII
334
Organization of the State Public School System
335
University of Georgia
338
Emory and Mercer universities
339
Educational work of the Freedmens Bureau
340
Churches
343
Continued division in other churches
344
Newspapers under reconstruction
347
Changes in population
349
Courts
352
Judicial appointments
354
Litigation after the war
361
Conditions in the northwest
362
Conditions in the eastern cotton belt
366
Organization of the Ku Klux Klan
369
Disturbance in cities
370
Disturbance on the coast
381
Ogeechee insurrection
383
Education of freedmen 124
385
Loyal Leagues
386
Purpose of the Ku Klux movement
391
Emancipation the basic fact of reconstruction
395
Effects of emancipation on agriculture 306
398
Social disturbance
399
Advance toward greater social democracy
401
Bibliography
402
CHAPTER III
505
The Review of American Colonial Legislation by
657

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