The magdalen, and other tales

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 186 - Oh ! there are looks and tones that dart An instant sunshine through the heart, — As if the soul that minute caught Some treasure it through life had sought...
Page 160 - Did she not accuse you of intended theft? — Were you not instantly discharged?" successively asked the advocate, without eliciting any reply. " Why do you not answer, girl?" peremptorily demanded he. — " If you are determined to destroy my character," said the witness, bursting into tears, " I cannot help it." " No," rejoined the advocate ; " I do not intend to destroy a character; I mean to save one — one which, before you quit the court, I shall prove to be as free from soil as the snow of...
Page 157 - Do you truly believe that she deposited the jewel in her trunk ?" " I do not like to think ill of any one." " That is not an answer to my question : — Do you believe that she put it there ?" " How else could it have come there ?" " Answer me, Yes or No,
Page 158 - And why did you not answer me at once?" — " I do not like that such questions should be put to me," replied the attendant. For a minute or two the advocate was silent. A feeling of disappointment seemed to pervade the whole court ; now and then a half suppressed sigh was heard; and here and there a handkerchief was lifted to an eye, which was no sooner wiped than it was turned again upon Therese with an expression of the most lively commiseration. The maid herself was the only individual who appeared...
Page 150 - You have had a visitor this morning," said the count. "A friend," said she, with a sigh. "And nothing more?" inquired the count. Therese was silent. " Come," said the count to the baroness, " I fear we intrude upon Therese — at least my company can be dispensed with. You, if you like, can stay, and I shall call for you in an hour." " My lord ! my lord !" cried Therese, as the count was departing, " you go in displeasure ! Something has offended you ! What is it, my lord ? If the fault lies with...
Page 158 - There was a pause and a profound silence. After about a minute had elapsed— " Well ?' said the advocate. Another pause; while in an assembly where hundreds of human hearts were throbbing, not an individual stirred or even appeared to breathe, such was the pitch of intensity to which the suspense of the court was wound up. "Well," said the advocate a second time, "will you answer me?
Page 178 - He may have associates, who are at hand;" said Madame le Croix, after a pause. " Did you not part in anger with Julian ? " added she. "Do you think 'tis Julian?" asked Monsieur le Croix. " Julian could not meditate any injury to us," said Madame le Croix, musing. " Do you think it is he ? " repeated her husband, more earnestly. " Would you be uneasy if it was ? " inquired his wife. " I should almost think so, from the tone in which you speak." " He has taken up with companions, I fear," said Monsieur...
Page 153 - ... Early upon the morning of the trial was the baroness with Therese. She found her attired in black. " Why not dress in white?" inquired the baroness. " I wear," replied Therese, " the dress that I shall wear for ever, unless Providence has ordained that I shall take it off to-day." The baroness asked her how she felt. " Prepared," was her answer. Ever since she had entered the prison, she had accustomed herself to regard her conviction as certain.
Page 122 - It should have height, fulness, tenuity, proportion, should it not? It had. Nothing exceeding or coming short. Nor would one be surprised if grace and stateliness, in carriage and in gait, were the attributes of such a figure. In fact, sitting, standing, or walking, one would never have inferred Therese's occupation from Therese; and every one, especially Count Theodore, wondered how she became the maid of the Lady Julie — though countesses have sometimes very lady-like maids. The first time the...
Page 144 - ... but an open one — and the countess, entering her apartment alone, found Therese up, and in readiness to wait upon her. The countess's toilet was soon made. Little pains did it cost at any time, under the active and tasteful hands of Therese, and now less than ever, for the lady sat passive and abstracted, as though she took not the smallest interest in the operation ; but her face was flushed, and languor hung upon her features. She desired the bell to be rung; a page entered, and she asked...

Bibliographic information