C̦a ira!

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Lee and Shepard, 1887 - France - 261 pages
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Page 213 - If a great change is to be made in human affairs, the minds of men will be fitted to it; the general opinions and feelings will draw that way. Every fear, every hope will forward it; and then they who persist in opposing this mighty current in human affairs, will appear rather to resist the decrees of Providence itself, than the mere designs of men. They will not be resolute and firm, but perverse and obstinate.
Page 83 - Patroles, consisting of sixty pikemen, were in every street. The nocturnal tumult of so many armed men ; the incessant knocks to make people open their doors ; the crash of those that were burst off their hinges ; and the continual uproar and revelling, which took place throughout the night in all the public-houses, formed a picture which will never be effaced from my memory.
Page 185 - ... descended from heaven ; is neither a nymph from the opera, nor a red cap, nor a dirty shirt. It is happiness, equality, justice, the Declaration of Rights ; it is our sublime constitution. Do you want me to fall at the feet of that Liberty ? spend all my blood for it ? Then open the prisons to the two hundred thousand citizens you call suspects, for in our Declaration of Rights there are not mentioned at all any prisons of suspicion, but only prisons of arrest. You will exterminate all your enemies...
Page 83 - Let him fancy to himself streets so populous and so animated, suddenly struck with the dead silence of the grave, before sunset on a fine summer evening. All the shops are shut : everybody retires into the interior of his house, trembling for life and property ; all are in fearful expectation of the events of a night in which even the efforts of despair are not likely to afford the least resource to any individual. The sole object of the domiciliary visits, it is pretended...
Page 192 - What you have done for the happiness and liberty of your country, I have in vain tried to do for mine.
Page 83 - ... trembling for life and property ; all are in fearful expectation of the events of a night in which even the efforts of despair are not likely to afford the least resource to any individual. The sole object of the domiciliary visits, it is pretended, is to search for arms, yet the barriers are shut and guarded with the strictest vigilance, and boats are stationed on the river, at regular distances, filled with armed men. Every one supposes himself to be informed against.
Page 165 - When you sow the vast field of the republic, do not, I implore you, count the cost of the seed! Next after bread, education is the first necessary of life for the people.
Page 270 - We see that political systems in all progressive societies tend toward socialistic democracy. We see everywhere that it must come to that. We all of us feel this conviction, or all of us, I suppose, who have reflected on the matter. We feel, too, that nothing we can do can avert or possibly long delay the consummation. Then, we must believe that the movement is being guided, or is guiding itself to happy issues.
Page 83 - One man, squeezed up behind the wainscot which has been nailed back on him, seems to form a part of the wall ; another is suffocated with fear and heat between two mattresses ; a third, rolled up in a cask, loses all sense of existence by the tension of his sinews, Apprehension is stronger than pain. Men tremble, but they do not shed tears ; the heart shivers, the eye is dull, and the breast contracted, Women, on this occasion, display prodigies of tenderness and intrepidity. It was by them that...
Page 83 - All the shops are shut-, everybody retires into the interior of his house, trembling for life and property; all are in fearful expectation of the events of a night in which even the efforts of despair are not likely to afford the least resource to any individual. The sole object of the domiciliary visits, it is pretended, is to search for arms; .yet the...

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