The Battle of Tsu-shima: Between the Japanese and Russian Fleets, Fought on 27th May 1905

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E. P. Dutton, 1908 - Russo-Japanese War, 1904-1905 - 165 pages
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Page 62 - But how could I make detailed notes when it seemed impossible even to count the number of projectiles striking us? I had not only never witnessed such a fire before, but I had never imagined anything like it. Shells seemed to be pouring upon us incessantly, one after another.
Page 159 - The Borodino ! Look ! the Borodino ! " was shouted on all sides. I raised myself, as quickly as possible on my arm, but where the Borodino had been nothing was visible save a patch of white foam...
Page 69 - Were not my recent thoughts, which I had not dared to put into words, realised? No! The enemy had finished turning. His twelve ships were in perfect order at close intervals, steaming parallel to us, but gradually forging ahead. No disorder was noticeable. It seemed to me that with my Zeiss glasses (the distance was a little more than 4,000 yards), I could even distinguish the mantlets of hammocks on the bridges, and groups of men. But with us? I looked round. What havoc! - Burning bridges, smouldering...
Page 64 - In addition to this, there was the unusual high temperature and liquid flame of the explosion, which seemed to spread over everything. I actually watched a steel plate catch fire from a burst. Of course, the steel did not burn, but the paint on it did. Such almost non-combustible materials as hammocks, and rows of boxes, drenched with water, flared up in a moment. At times it was impossible to see anything with glasses, owing to every thing being so distorted with the quivering, heated air.
Page 65 - Vesuvium." In addition to this, there was the unusual high temperature and liquid flame of the explosion, which seemed to spread over everything. I actually watched a steel plate catch fire from a burst. Of course, the steel did not burn, but the paint on it did. Such almost non - combustible materials as hammocks, and rows of boxes, drenched with water, flared up in a moment.
Page 142 - ... direct action of fire, exploding ammunition, and, particularly, asphyxiation. In judging the extent of the damage thus inflicted, Semenoff's graphic picture of conditions on the flagship is especially informing. Referring to the time (5.30 pm) Admiral Rodjestvensky was leaving this vessel, he says: "The mess deck was in, darkness (the electric light had gone out) and was full of suffocating smoke. Hurrying along to find the staff, we called them by name, but received no answers. The silence of...
Page 10 - Once again, and for the last time, we were forcibly reminded of the old truism that a " fleet" is created by long years of practice at sea in time of peace (cruising, not remaining in port), and, that a collection of ships of various types hastily collected, which have only learned to sail together on the way to the scene of operations, is no fleet, but a chance concourse of vessels.
Page 63 - After six months with the Port Arthur squadron I had grown indifferent to most things. Shimose and melinite were to a certain extent old acquaintances, but this was something new. It seemed as if these were mines, not shells, which were striking the ship's side and falling on the deck. They burst as soon as they touched anything - the moment they encountered the least impediment in their flight. Handrails, funnel guys, topping lifts of the boats' derricks, were quite sufficient to cause a thoroughly...
Page xv - Admiral Togo was determined to force a decisive action. Moreover, the Japanese had, meanwhile, improved their fuses. Thus, in the later action, "shells seemed to be pouring upon us incessantly. ... It seemed as if these were mines, not shells. . . . They burst as soon as they touched anything. . . . No ! It was different to the 10th August." Incidentally the author notes the "portmanteaus" (Japanese 12-inch shell) "curving awkwardly head over heels through the air and falling anyhow on the water.
Page xvii - Borodino also sank hi five hours, apparently as the result of the explosion of a magazine; and the Orel surrendered on the 28th with main turrets not seriously injured and thick armour not penetrated. The general impression conveyed by Captain Semenoff, and confirmed from other sources, is that the Russian ships were overwhelmed by the volume of the Japanese fire, and that frequency of hitting rather than weight of shells should be the main object. If this conclusion is correct, the principle which...

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