Cuba, and the Cubans: Comprising a History of the Island of Cuba, Its Present Social, Political, and Domestic Condition: Also, Its Relation to England and the United States,

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S. Hueston, 1850 - Cuba - 255 pages
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Page 189 - Tbe condition of the islands of Cuba and Porto Rico, is of deeper import, and more immediate bearing upon the present interests, and future prospects of our Union. The correspondence herewith transmitted, will show how earnestly it has engaged the attention of this Government The invasion of both those islands by the united forces ef Mexico and Colombia, is avowedly among the objects to be matured by the belligerent States at Panama.
Page 10 - Remedios was founded; and on the 25th of July, 1515, at the place now called Batabano, on the south side of the Island, was planted a town with the name of San Cristobal de la Habana, in deference to the memory of the illustrious discoverer; but in the year 1519 this name was transferred to the place where the capital now stands. The leaning of the Spaniards toward the southern side of the Island appears to have arisen from their previous possession of Jamaica and the Costa Firme; as till then they...
Page 8 - Ferdinand, the Island was called Fernandina. It afterward received the name of Santiago, as a mark of reverence for the patron saint of Spain, and still later, the inhabitants, to illustrate their piety, gave it that of Ave Maria, in honor of the Holy Virgin. Notwithstanding these several titles, the Island is still principally known by its original Indian name of Cuba; a name which it bore when the great navigator first landed on its shores, and which in all probability it is destined to retain....
Page 11 - Adelantado of the Floridas, added the office of Governor of Cuba, having arrived at Santiago, passed a few days there, and then proceeded to the continent. In his absence he left the government of the Island in the hands of a lady, Dona Isabel de Bobadilla, and gave her for a colleague, Don Juan de Rojas. This Rojas had previously resided at the Havana, in quality of lieutenantgovernor; and...
Page 20 - Matanzas was founded, the first lines of it having been traced on the 10th of October 1693, in presence of the Captain-General, and many other persons of distinction. The etymology of the name Matanzas is much disputed by the antiquarians of Cuba, some ascribing it to the slaughter of Indians at the time of the conquest of the island, contending that the supposed Indian name Yumuri, that of one of the two rivers between which the city stands, is in fact a synonym in bad Spanish for this general massacre....
Page 22 - The date of the termination of the government of Martinez has not been very clearly defined: he was succeeded provisionally by Don Diego de Penalosa, as Teniente Rey de la Plaza, and was replaced in 1747 by Don Francisco Cagigal de la Vega, who had previously been Lieutenant-Governor at Santiago. On leaving the command in 1760, the government was assumed provisionally by the Teniente...
Page 78 - ... quitrin, as if he meant to climb by them. " In his pale face the marks of despair and the symptoms of death could be traced, and fear and bitter anguish were the feelings which agitated his soul in the last moments of his life. He was the white accountant, who had been nearly murdered by the blacks, and having escaped from their ferocious hold, was making the last efforts to save a mere breath of life. His cries, his prayers, were calculated to make the heart faint. Rafael found himself in the...
Page 28 - Havana, between the points where the invading forces had landed, in order to prevent them from turning the head of the harbor and attacking the city by land. The British force was divided into five brigades, amounting, with detachments from Jamaica and North America, to a total of 14,041 land forces. At daybreak, on the 7th, the troops were already on board the boats arranged in three divisions — the centre commanded by the Honorable Augustus Hervey; the right wing by Captains Barton and Drake...
Page 80 - ... of truth. This remark, however, applies, in the paragraphs quoted, only to the assertion that the slaves in any case objected to being made free, or that such gifts were so common. There are facts both pleasing to the philanthropist and worthy of credit. The following, from the touching pen of the lady of Merlin, afford a happy illustration of them : " Though the slave enjoys the right of holding property, at his death it passes to the master; but if he leaves children, the proprietor never deprives...
Page 51 - This brings us to a period marked by fluctuations in the political history of Spain and her dependencies, and it is now to be seen what were their effect upon Cuba. The political changes adopted in Spain in 1812 and 1820 were productive of similar changes in the Island ; and when in both instances the constitution was proclaimed, the perpetual members of the municipalities were at once deprived of office, and their successors elected by the people. The provincial assembly was called, and held its...

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