Observations Upon Certain Roman Roads and Towns in the South of Britain ... H.L.L. ..

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Nichols and sons, 1836 - England - 85 pages
 

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Page 54 - Petworth, and did not get out of the coaches (save only when we were overturned or stuck fast in the mire) till we arrived at our journey's end. 'Twas a hard service for the prince...
Page 54 - We set out at six in the morning, by torchlight, to go to Petworth, and did not get out of the coaches (save only when we were overturned or stuck fast in the mire) till we arrived at our journey's end. 'Twas...
Page 54 - ... if the nimble boors of Sussex had not frequently poised it or supported it with their shoulders from Godalming almost to Petworth ; and the nearer we approached to the Duke's house the more inaccessible it seemed to be. The last nine miles of the way cost us six hours...
Page 55 - Highness's body coach, would have suffered very much, if the nimble boors of Sussex had not frequently poised it, or supported it with their shoulders, from Godalming almost to Petworth, and the nearer we approached the Duke's house the more inaccessible it seemed to be. The last nine miles of the way cost us six hours...
Page 55 - I saw him (the Prince) no more, till I found him at supper at Windsor ; for there we were overturned (as we had been once before the same morning), and broke our coach ; my Lord Delawarre had the same fate, and so had several others.
Page 55 - Petworth ; and the nearer we approached the duke's house, the more unaccessible it seemed to be. The last nine miles of the way cost us six hours time to conquer them; and indeed we had never done it, if our good master had not several times lent us a pair of horses out of his own coach, whereby we were able to trace out the way for him.
Page 36 - These forests, as I say, the daughters of the Weald, (That in their heavy breasts had long their griefs concealed,) Foreseeing their decay each hour so fast come on, Under the axe's stroke...
Page 7 - ... by any expedient be brought to coincide, either with Henley, Wallingford, or Reading ; but all agree in regard to Silchester. Its distance nearly accords with the Itinerary distance of Calleva from London, Bath, Spene, Winchester, and Caerleon, and, if a station (which is evidently lost) in the Iter of Antonine be supplied, with that from Cirencester. The present remains are those of a great Roman town ; it is situated in the district formerly inhabited by the Atrebates ; and in every direction...
Page 40 - Do thy diligence to come before winter. Eubulus greeteth thee, and Pudens, and Linus, and Claudia, and all the brethren.
Page 10 - Britanniae, p. 36; and though it may not seem probable that he wrote from the Mss. of a Roman general, he shows a genuine knowledge of antiquity, very extraordinary for a monk of the fourteenth century.

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