Unhappy Soldier: Hino Ashihei and Japanese World War II Literature

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Lexington Books, 2002 - Literary Criticism - 180 pages
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Unhappy Soldier chronicles the writings of Hino Ashihei, Japan's most popular World War II writer. Ashihei rose to national celebrity status during the Pacific War for his accounts of campaigns in China and Southeast Asia, works that identified and sympathized with the common soldier. Despite being linked to the nationalistic ideology of the wartime state and purged during the Occupation, Ashihei proved to be an enduring literary and cultural phenomenon, reinventing himself with new, postwar writing that confronted the sunny patriotism of his wartime work. David Rosenfeld's book the first in-depth study of wartime Japanese literature in English provides a wealth of new material on how writing about the war was read during and after the conflict and new insight into the formation of Japan's national discourse on the war experience."
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
Wartime
23
Purge and SelfPity
61
The Other Face of War
91
Fighting The Postwar
111
Remembering Hino
145
Bibliography
163
Index
179
About the Author
181
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

David M. Rosenfeld is a lecturer in the Department of Classics at the University of Michigan.

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