History of Italy During the Consulate and Empire of Napoleon Buonaparte, Volume 1

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Baldwin and Cradock, 1828 - Italy
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Page 57 - French and Genoese. But cruel and horrible beyond all description was the spectacle presented by the German prisoners of war, confined in certain old barges anchored in the port ; for such was the dire necessity at last, that for some days they were left without nutriment of any description. They eat their shoes, they devoured the leather of their pouches, and, scowling darkly at each other, their sinister glances betrayed the horrid fear of being at last reduced to a more fearful resource. In the...
Page 73 - ... surefooted mules. And thus this same passage, which Trivulzi accomplished in the severest season of the year, hauling up the artillery of Francis the first, from rock to rock, over the wintry barriers, Buonaparte effected in the service of the republic by means of sledges, carriages, and beasts of burden. The ascent to be accomplished was immense: in the windings of the tortuous paths the troops were now lost, and now revealed to sight Those who first mounted the steeps, seeing their companions...
Page 42 - Suchet, who had been driven back beyond Nice, defended the ancient frontier of France on the banks of the Varo with a degree of courage, intelligence, and activity, worthy of the highest praise. His services at this period proved of the utmost consequence to the republic, not only preserving her own territory inviolate, but gaining time for the mighty design of the consul in Italy. And now the hoary and victorious Melas began to discover that he had fallen into the snare laid for him by the youthful...
Page 73 - The vallies on every side re-echoed to their voices. Amidst the snow, in mists and clouds, the resplendent arms and coloured uniforms of the soldiers appeared in bright and dazzling contrast ; the sublimity of dead nature, and the energy of living action thus united, formed a spectacle of surpassing wonder. The Consul exulting in the success of his plans, was seen...
Page 49 - Diamond;" and Gottescheim, passing Starla, approached San Martino d'Albaro and the walls of the city. In aid of all these movements on the eastern side, Otto attacked Rivarolo on the western. The Germans succeeded in almost all these attempts; they gained mount Ratti, the Two Brothers, and fort Tecla. Fort Richelieu and the Diamond were surrounded. Gottesheim had already gained one-half of San Martino, and was occupied in reducing the other. The danger of the French was great ; for, if the Germans...
Page 310 - He was arrayed in imperial robes of velvet, purple and gold, with the diadem upon his brow, and the crown and sceptre of Charlemagne in his hands. He placed the crown upon his own head, repeating aloud the historical words : " God has given it to me — woe to him who touches it !" He remained in Milan a month, busy night and day, in projecting improvements of the most majestic character.
Page 51 - Keith prevented the entrance of supplies by sea, Otto by land. Provisions became scarce — scarcity grew into want. When this deficiency was first dreaded, food was dealt out in scanty portions ; it was then adulterated ; and, finally, every thing most disgusting was devoured — not only horses and dogs, but even cats, mice, bats, and worms ; and happy was he who could obtain these. The Austrians had taken the mills of Bisagno, Voltri, and Pegli, and none were left to prepare the corn. This was...
Page 55 - Massena, nor the other generals, would allow themselves greater indulgences than private individuals ; they fared like the plebeians — a laudable instance of self-denial, and highly efficacious in enabling others to bear up against their privations. A little cheese and a few vegetables was the only nourishment given to the sick and wounded in the hospitals. Men and women, in the last agonies of starvation and despair, filled the air with their groans and shrieks. Sometimes, while uttering these...
Page 44 - Appennines, between the rivers Polcevera and Bisagno, and is guarded by an outer and inner circuit of wall.* These two circumvallations are furnished with bastions and curtains, according to the circumstances of the steep, rocky, and broken grounds. The first wall begins on the right bank of the Bisagno, on • The one six, the other thirteen miles in extent.— Tr.
Page 73 - They had now reached an elevation, where skill or courage seemed as nothing against the potency of nature. From St. Pierre to the summit of the Great St. Bernard there is no beaten road whatever, until is reached the monastery of the religious order devoted to the preservation of travellers bewildered in these regions of eternal winter ; narrow and winding paths, over steep and rugged mountains, alone present themselves to the eye. But here the pertinacity of human resolution, the power of human...

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