The Yudhoyono Presidency: Indonesia's Decade of Stability and Stagnation

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Edward Aspinall, Marcus Mietzner, Dirk Tomsa
Institute of Southeast Asian Studies, May 13, 2015 - Political Science - 362 pages
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 The presidency of Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono (2004–14) was a watershed in Indonesia's modern democratic history. Yudhoyono was not only the first Indonesian president to be directly elected, but also the first to be democratically re-elected. Coming to office after years of turbulent transition, he presided over a decade of remarkable political stability and steady economic growth. But other aspects of his rule have been the subject of controversy. While supporters view his presidency as a period of democratic consolidation and success, critics view it as a decade of stagnation and missed opportunities. This book is the first comprehensive attempt to evaluate both the achievements and the shortcomings of the Yudhoyono presidency. With contributions from leading experts on Indonesia's politics, economy and society, it assesses the Yudhoyono record in fields ranging from economic development and human rights, to foreign policy, the environment and the security sector.

 

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Contents

Yudhoyonos decade in power by Edward Aspinall Marcus Mietzner and Dirk Tomsa
1
Yudhoyonos legacy an insiders view by Dewi Fortuna Anwar
23
Personal comparative and international perspectives
33
Institutions politics and security
91
Gender human rights and environment
197
The economy and social policies
279
Index
345
Indonesia Update Series
361
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About the author (2015)

 •Edward Aspinall is Professor, Department of Political and Social Change, Coral Bell School of Asia Pacific Affairs, College of Asia and the Pacific, Australian National University, Canberra.

•Marcus Mietzner is Associate Professor, Department of Political and Social Change, Coral Bell School of Asia Pacific Affairs, College of Asia and the Pacific, Australian National University, Canberra.

•Dirk Tomsa is Senior Lecturer, College of Arts, Social Sciences and Commerce, Department of Politics and Philosophy, La Trobe University, Melbourne.

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