The Red Rockets' Glare: Spaceflight and the Russian Imagination, 1857-1957

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Feb 26, 2010 - History - 402 pages
The Red Rockets' Glare is the first academic study on the birth of the Soviet space program and one of the first social histories of Soviet science. Based on many years of archival research, the book situates the birth of cosmic enthusiasm within the social and cultural upheavals of Russian and Soviet history. Asif A. Siddiqi frames the origins of Sputnik by bridging imagination with engineering - seeing them not as dialectic, discrete, and sequential but as mutable, intertwined, and concurrent. Imagination and engineering not only fed each other but were also co-produced by key actors who maintained a delicate line between secret work on rockets (which interested the military) and public prognostications on the cosmos (which captivated the populace). Sputnik, he argues, was the outcome of both large-scale state imperatives to harness science and technology and populist phenomena that frequently owed little to the whims and needs of the state apparatus.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Shrike58 - LibraryThing

With this pre-history of Russian space flight, the author seeks to tease out the processes by which popular enthusiasm for the concept of spaceflight eventually influenced Soviet policy and led to the ... Read full review

Contents

IV
16
V
43
VI
74
VII
114
VIII
155
IX
196
X
241
XI
290
XII
332
XIII
363
XIV
373
XV
376
XVI
377
XVII
389
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2010)

Asif A. Siddiqi is an Assistant Professor of History at Fordham University. He specializes in the social and cultural history of modern Russia and the history of science and technology. His work has been supported by the American Historical Association, the Smithsonian Institution, the Social Science Research Council, the National Science Foundation, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. His prior book, Challenge to Apollo: The Soviet Union and the Space Race, 1945 974 (2000), received a number of awards including a citation by the Wall Street Journal as one of the best books ever written on space exploration. He received his Ph.D. from Carnegie Mellon University and currently lives in New York.

Bibliographic information