Text Genres and Registers: The Computation of Linguistic Features

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Springer, Feb 5, 2015 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 267 pages
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This book is a description of some of the most recent advances in text classification as part of a concerted effort to achieve computer understanding of human language. In particular, it addresses state-of-the-art developments in the computation of higher-level linguistic features, ranging from etymology to grammar and syntax for the practical task of text classification according to genres, registers and subject domains. Serving as a bridge between computational methods and sophisticated linguistic analysis, this book will be of particular interest to academics and students of computational linguistics as well as professionals in natural language engineering.
 

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Contents

Chapter1
1
Chapter2
11
Chapter3
26
Chapter4
55
Chapter5
71
Chapter6
83
Chapter7
117
Chapter8
134
Chapter12
217
Appendix A
221
Appendix B
228
Appendix C
233
Appendix D
235
Appendix E
237
Appendix F
239
Appendix G
242

Chapter9
143
Chapter10
167
Chapter11
182

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About the author (2015)

Alex Fang is based at the Department of Chinese, Translation and Linguistics, City University of Hong Kong and lectures on topics devoted to corpus linguistics, computational linguistics and machine translation. He is also Adjunct Professor at the Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics in Beijing, China. He is Director of the Dialogue Systems Group (http://dsg.ctl.cityu.edu.hk) and currently supervises 6 PhD students. He has published widely and his most recent monographs include English Corpora and Automated Grammatical Analysis (2007) and Contributions of Syntax to Terminology Extraction (2010). He is National Expert representing China in the International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO) on Technical Committee 37 for terminology and language resources, where he has participated in the drafting of several international standards for language resource annotation. He is also an appointed expert member of the China National Technical Committee for the Standardization of Terminologies and Language Resources. He serves on the programme committee of several major international conferences on computational linguistics. He was previously Deputy Director of the Survey of English Usage, University College London, where he received his PhD in linguistics.

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