Risks of Faith: The Emergence of a Black Theology of Liberation, 1968-1998

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Beacon Press, 2000 - Religion - 194 pages
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"American religious thought at its best."—Michael Eric Dyson, author of I May Not Get There with You: The True Martin Luther King, Jr.
From the birth of Black Theology to James Cone's seminal work on the theology of Martin Luther King, Jr., and the philosophy of Malcolm X, to the importance of the environmental movement, Risks of Faith presents the best and breadth of Black Theology.

"James Hal Cone has almost singlehandedly re-shaped western theological thought to make it racially inclusive by demythologizing the conventional myths and shibboleths which kept it a white spiritual and philosophical preserve for centuries."—C. Eric Lincoln, William Rand Kenan Professor of Religion and Culture (Emeritus), Duke University

"This volume of new and classic texts offers a wide-ranging introduction to the esteemed theologian's work."—Emerge

"Risks of Faith shows that Cone is as much a prophet after thirty years as he was in the beginning."—Delores S. Williams, author of Black Theology in a New Key

"Risks of Faith will be a revelation to those unaware that Black Religion reflects the finest modern manifestation of Jesus' teachings."—Derrick Bell, author of Gospel Choirs
 

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RISKS OF FAITH: The Emergence of a Black Theology of Liberation, 1968-1998

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

These three decades— of essays on black theology from James Cone (Union Theological Seminary; A Black Theology of Liberation, 1970, etc.), one of the nation's leading liberation theologians, chart ... Read full review

Risks of faith: the emergence of a Black theology of liberation, 1968-1998

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Both of these well-written and easily accessible books situate black theology in the context of the African American church and in opposition to white-dominated theologies. After a brief introduction ... Read full review

Contents

III
3
IV
13
V
28
VI
40
VII
51
VIII
53
IX
74
X
83
XII
109
XIII
111
XIV
121
XV
130
XVI
138
XVII
146
XVIII
162
Copyright

XI
96

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About the author (2000)

A leading African American theologian and an advocate of black theology, James H. Cone was born in Fordyce, Arkansas. Cone came of age during the civil rights movement and he was drawn to the black power movement that gained prominence in the late 1960s. Rejecting the nonviolence of Martin Luther King, Jr., Cone moved to join theology with the militant, separatist vision of Malcolm X, with its espousal of forceful societal change to achieve racial equality. Cone's book Black Theology and Black Power (1969) eloquently equated black power with the political and spiritual liberation of black Americans. In it, he equated blackness as symbolic of oppression and whiteness as symbolic of the oppressors. Cone continued his teachings of what soon became known as "black theology" in a second book, A Black Theology of Liberation (1971), which strongly condemned racism and oppression. During the 1970s, Cone became a force in the development of liberation theologies in Third World countries. Beginning in 1976, he became an important figure in the Ecumenical Association of Third World Theologians. Cone's association with liberation theologies also broadened and transformed his vision of Christian theology. In Crosscurrents, published in 1977, he strongly articulated the view that Christian theology must move beyond reaction to white racism in America. Cone joined the faculty of Union Theological Seminary in 1969 and was appointed to the distinguished Charles A. Biggs chair of systematic theology in 1977.

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