The Works of the Most Reverend Father in God, William Laud, Sometime Lord Archbishop of Canterbury: pt. 1. History of his chancellorship, etc

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J.H. Parker, 1853 - Theology, Doctrinal
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Page 305 - This book is a preservation photocopy. It was produced on Hammermill Laser Print natural white, a 60 # book weight acid-free archival paper which meets the requirements of ANSI/NISO Z39.48-1992 (permanence of paper) Preservation photocopying and binding by Acme Bookbinding Charlestown, Massachusetts CD 1995 The borrower must return this item on or before the last date stamped below.
Page 154 - Queen, that neither the Play, nor clothes, nor stage, might come into the hands and use of the common players abroad, which was graciously granted.
Page 153 - Queen, and attended them into the Hall, whither I had the happiness to bring them by a way prepared from the President's lodging to the Hall, without any the least disturbance ; and had the Hall kept as fresh and cool, that there was not any one person when the King and Queen came into it. The Princes, Nobles, and Ladies entered the same way with the King, and then presently another door was opened below to fill the Hall with the better sort of company ; which being done, the Play was begun and acted....
Page 16 - Formalities (which are in a sort the outward and visible face of the University) are in a manner utterly decayed...
Page 130 - and he went to his bookcase, took down a book, and read, " ' The very truth is, that all wise princes respect the welfare of their estates, and consider that schools and universities are (as in the body) the noble and vital parts, which, being vigorous and sound, send good blood and active spirits into the veins and arteries, which cause health and strength ; or, if feeble or ill-affected, corrupt all the vital parts ; whereupon grow diseases, and in the end, death itself.
Page 130 - But the very truth is, that all wise princes respect the welfare of their estates, and consider, that schools and universities are (as in the body) the noble and vital parts, which being vigorous and sound, send good blood and active spirits into the veins and arteries, which cause health and strength : or if feeble or ill affected, corrupt all the vital powers ; whereupon grow diseases, and in the end death itself.
Page 224 - I well know, the proctor will have little eredit abroad in the streets, if he shall have contempt put upon him at home in his college. Secondly, your declining the vice-chancellor in this manner, and your refusing to answer upon oath, when the proctor offers to justify all his complaint by oath in every particular, makes me think the proctor's relation is true in every circumstance ; and if it be true both in circumstance and substance, though for government sake (which you have so slighted in the...
Page 300 - William, Lord- Archbishop of Canterbury, to the University of Oxford, when he resigned his Office of Chancellor. Published, by Occasion of a base Libel and Forgery, that runs under the Title : and also the Answer of the University to the said Letter.
Page 83 - And particularly I pray see, that none, youth or other, be suffered to go in boots and spurs, or to wear their hair undecently long, or with a lock in the present fashion, or with slashed doublets, or in any light or garish colours".

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