The Poems

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Macmillan, 1983 - English literature - 747 pages
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This collection of the lyrical, narrative and dramatic poetry published by Yeats from 1889 to 1939 incorporates his own final revisions and is indexed by titles and first lines.

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Contents

Crossways 1889
7
The Sad Shepherd
8
The Cloak the Boat and the Shoes
9
Anashuya and Vijaya
10
The Indian upon God
13
The Indian to his Love
14
Ephemera
15
The Madness of King Goll
16
The Cold Heaven
125
The Magi
126
A Coat
127
Closing Rhyme
128
The Wild Swans at Coole 1919
129
The Wild Swans at Coole
131
In Memory of Major Robert Gregory
132
An Irish Airman foresees his Death
135

The Stolen Child
18
To an Isle in the Water
20
The Meditation of the Old Fisherman
21
The Ballad of Moll Magee
23
The Ballad of the Foxhunter
24
The Rose 1893
31
Fergus and the Druid
32
Cuchulains Fight with the Sea
33
The Rose of the World
36
The Rose of Battle
37
A Faery Song
38
The Lake Isle of Innisfree
39
The Pity of Love
40
When You are Old
41
A Dream of Death
42
Who goes with Fergus?
43
The Dedication to a Book of Stories selected from the Irish Novelists
45
The Lamentation of the Old Pensioner
46
The Two Trees
48
To Some I have Talked with by the Fire
49
To Ireland in the Coming Times
50
The Wind Among the Reeds 1899
53
The Hosting of the Sidhe
55
The Moods
56
The Fish
58
Into the Twilight
59
The Song of the Old Mother
60
The Lover mourns for the Loss of Love
61
He bids his Beloved be at Peace
62
A Poet to his Beloved
63
To his Heart bidding it have no Fear
64
The Valley of the Black Pig
65
The Lover asks Forgiveness because of his Many Moods
66
He tells of a Valley full of Lovers
67
He thinks of Those who have spoken Evil of his Beloved
68
The Secret Rose
69
Maid Quiet
70
The Lover pleads with his Friend for Old Friends
71
The Poet pleads with the Elemental Powers
72
He wishes for the Cloths of Heaven
73
The Fiddler of Dooney
74
In the Seven Woods 1904
77
The Folly of being Comforted
78
Never give all the Heart
79
Adams Curse
80
Red Hanrahans Song about Ireland
81
The Old Men admiring Themselves in the Water
82
The Ragged Wood
83
The Players ask for a Blessing on the Psalteries and on Themselves
84
The Happy Townland
85
The Green Helmet and Other Poems 1910
87
His Dream
89
Words
90
No Second Troy
91
Peace
92
The Fascination of Whats Difficult
93
The Coming of Wisdom with Time
94
The Mask
95
At the Abbey Theatre
96
At Galway Races
97
Brown Penny
98
Responsibilities 1914
99
Introductory Rhymes
101
The Grey Rock
103
To a Wealthy Man who promised a second Subscription to the Dublin Municipal Gallery if it were proved the People wanted Pictures
107
September 1913
108
To a Friend whose Work has come to Nothing
109
To a Shade
110
When Helen lived
111
The Three Hermits
113
Beggar to Beggar cried
114
Running to Paradise
115
The Hour before Dawn
116
A Song from The Player Queen
120
The Witch
121
To a Child dancing in the Wind
122
A Memory of Youth
123
Friends
124
Men improve with the Years
136
Under the Round Tower
137
Solomon to Sheba
138
A Song
139
To a Young Girl
140
Tom ORoughley
141
Lines written in Dejection
145
The Dawn
146
The Fisherman
148
A Deepsworn Vow
154
Michael Robartes and the Dancer
175
The Tower 1928
193
Nineteen Hundred and Nineteen
206
A Prayer for my Son
212
Fragments
214
Owen Aherne and his Dancers
220
The Three Monuments
227
The Winding Stair and Other Poems 1933
233
Oil and Blood
239
Statistics
240
At Algeciras a Meditation upon Death
246
Quarrel in Old Age
253
Parnells Funeral
279
The Gyres
293
The Ladys First Song
299
Roger Casement
305
The ORahilly
307
Come Gather Round Me Parnellites
309
The Wild Old Wicked Man
310
The Great Day
312
The Pilgrim
313
Colonel Martin
314
A Model for the Laureate
316
The Old Stone Cross
317
The Spirit Medium
318
Those Images
319
Are You Content
321
Last Poems 193839
325
Three Songs to the One Burden
328
The Black Tower
331
Cuchulain Comforted
332
Three Marching Songs
333
In Taras Halls
336
News for the Delphic Oracle
337
Longlegged Fly
339
A Bronze Head
340
A Stick of Incense
341
John Kinsellas Lament for Mrs Mary Moore
342
High Talk
343
The Apparitions
344
The Wanderings of Oisin 1889
355
The Old Age of Queen Maeve 1903
389
Baile and Aillinn 1903
397
Introductory Lines
405
The Two Kings 1914
435
The Gift of Harun AlRashid 1923
445
A1 The Island of Statues
453
A2 Love and Death
483
A6 On Mr Nettleships Picture at the Royal
490
A8 Remembrance
502
A12 She Who Dwelt among the Sycamores
509
A15 The Phantom Ship
511
A23 Quatrains and Aphorisms
525
A43 I am come to cry with you woman
538
A48 Theres broth in the pot for you old man
539
A56 They are gone they are gone The proud
545
A69 I hear the wind ablow
551
A8o A womans beauty is like a white
556
A102 Let images of basalt black immovable
571
A109 Would I were there when they turn and Theban
574
A124 A Statesmans Holiday
583
Yeatss Notes in The Collected Poems 1933
589
Notes to Appendix A
600
Music from New Poems 1938
609
Textual Notes
709
Index to Titles
719
Index to First Lines
733
Copyright

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About the author (1983)

In his 1940 memorial lecture in Dublin, T. S. Eliot pronounced Yeats "one of those few whose history is the history of their own time, who are a part of the consciousness of an age which cannot be understood without them." Modern readers have increasingly agreed, and some now view Yeats even more than Eliot as the greatest modern poet in our language. Son of the painter John Butler Yeats, the poet divided his early years among Dublin, London, and the port of Sligo in western Ireland. Sligo furnished many of the familiar places in his poetry, among them the mountain Ben Bulben and the lake isle of Innisfree. Important influences on his early adulthood included his father, the writer and artist William Morris, the nationalist leader John O'Leary, and the occultist Madame Blavatsky. In 1889 he met the beautiful actress and Irish nationalist Maud Gonne; his long and frustrated love for her (she refused to marry him) would inspire some of his best work. Often and mistakenly viewed as merely a dreamy Celtic twilight, Yeats's work in the 1890s involved a complex attempt to unite his poetic, nationalist, and occult interests in line with his desire to "hammer [his] thoughts into unity." By the turn of the century, Yeats was immersed in the work with the Irish dramatic movement that would culminate in the founding of the Abbey Theatre in 1904 as a national theater for Ireland. Partly as a result of his theatrical experience, his poetry after 1900 began a complex "movement downwards upon life" fully evident in the Responsibilities volume of 1914. After that he published the extraordinary series of great volumes, all written after age 50, that continued until the end of his career. Widely read in various literary and philosophic traditions, Yeats owed his greatest debt to romantic poetry and once described himself, along with his coworkers John Synge and Lady Isabella Augusta Gregory, as a "last romantic." Yet he remained resolutely Irish as well and presented in his verse a persona bearing a subtle, idealized relationship to his everyday self. Political events such as the Easter Rising and the Irish civil war found their way into his poetry, as did personal ones such as marriage to the Englishwoman Georgiana "Georgie" Hyde-Lees in 1917, the birth of his children, and his sometime home in the Norman tower at Ballylee. So, too, did his increasing status as a public man, which included both the Nobel Prize in 1923 and a term as senator of the Irish Free State (1922--28). Yeats's disparate activities led to a lifelong quest for what he called "unity of being," which he pursued by "antinomies," or opposites. These included action and contemplation, life and art, fair and foul, and other famous pairs from his poetry. The most original poet of his age, he was also in ways the most traditional, and certainly the most substantial. His varied literary output included not only poems and plays but an array of prose forms such as essays, philosophy, fiction, reviews, speeches, and editions of folk and literary material. He also frequently revised his own poems, which exist in various published texts helpfully charted in the Variorum edition (1957).

The late Richard J. Finneran was general editor, with George Mills Harper, of "The Collected Works of W. B. Yeats" for many years; series editor of "The Poems" in the Cornell Yeats; and editor of "Yeats: An Annual of Critical and Textual Studies, " among other works. He held the Hodges Chair of Excellence at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville; was a past president of the South Atlantic Modern Language Association; and served as executive director of the Society for Textual Scholarship.

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