The Song of Albion: A Poem Commemorative of the Crisis. Lines On the Fall of Warsaw and Other Poems

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J. Cochrane, 1831 - English poetry - 171 pages
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Page 134 - of the dying, and the lament of the bereaved ? He " Sits amid the gaudy herd Of mute barbarians bending to his nod, And bears aloft his gold-invested front, And says within himself, ' I am a king, And wherefore should the clamorous voice of woe Intrude upon mine ear?'
Page 113 - of the northern mountains, it must be allowed to possess in the same proportion superior softness and beauty; and upon the whole, we feel ourselves entitled to exclaim with the patriotic Syrian —• Are not Pharphar and Abana, rivers of Damascus, better than all the rivers of Israel!'
Page 134 - barbarians bending to his nod, And bears aloft his gold-invested front, And says within himself, ' I am a king, And wherefore should the clamorous voice of woe Intrude upon mine ear?'
Page 123 - and sustain each other: the influence of his station, the extent of his enormities, invests with a kind of splendor, and the contempt we feel for his meanness and duplicity, is lost in the dread of his machinations, and the abhorrence of his crimes. Too long has he insulted the patience
Page 127 - slayers by the pest they spread, So hath our land breathed out—thy fame to dim, Thy strength to waste, and rot thee soul and limb— Her worst infections all condensed in him.
Page 111 - us esteem so fair and faultless, there is a sad graphic fidelity in the following passage. Referring to the era in question, he says, " The nation at this period seems to have groaned under as absolute a slavery, as
Page i - THE MULTITUDE OF THE WISE IS THE WELFARE OF THE WORLD: AND A WISE KING IS THE UPHOLDING OF THE PEOPLE. LONDON: WISDOM OF SOLOMON. JAMES COCHRANE AND CO. 11, WATERLOO PLACE, PALL MALL.
Page 124 - his countrymen ; nor ought we, when we observe the indifference with which the iniquities of Pitt's administration are viewed, to reproach the Romans for tamely submitting to the tyranny of Caligula and Domitian."—Robert HalFs Apology for the Liberty of the Press, Sfc. Note

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