Our Singing Country: Folk Songs and Ballads

Front Cover
Courier Corporation, Jan 1, 2000 - Music - 416 pages
This sequel to the Lomaxes' widely acclaimed American Ballads and Folk Songs includes melodies and words for tunes from all parts of the country. Songs include spirituals, hollers, game songs, lullabies, courting songs, chain-gang work songs, Cajun airs, breakdowns, and many more. Judith Tick, a scholar and award-winning author, provides a new fact-filled Introduction; notes on tune origins, two indexes, and an extensive bibliography round out this archive of some 200 authentic folk songs and ballads.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

INTRODUCTION TO THE Dover EDITION
11
INTRODUCTION To THE 1941 EDITION xix
11
MUSIC PREFACE xxix
11
Little Willies My Darlin
11
ExPLANATION of HEADNotEs xxxvii
11
Adieu to the Stone Walls 31 I
31
Mammas Gone to the Mail Boat
94
Old Bangham
149
We Dont Get No Justice Here in Atlanta
313
The Wild Colonial Boy
320
Harvey Logan
326
Duncan and Brady
333
Po Lazus
342
Roustabout Holler
350
Go Down Ol Hannah
356
Lights in the Quarters Burnin Mighty Dim
362

MEN AT WORK
197
113
200
128
206
The Wreck on the Somerset Road
254
Pass Around Your Bottle
296
131
300
Darling Corey
302
132
308
The Rising Sun Blues
368
Lines from the Blues
374
Take This Hammer
380
Marthy Had a Baby
386
Bibliography
405
134
411
Index of FIRST LINEs
414
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2000)

Born in Austin, Texas, and educated at Harvard University, the University of Texas, and Columbia University, American folklorist Alan Lomax is one of the most dedicated and knowledgeable folk-music scholars of the twentieth century. Lomax became interested in collecting and recording folk songs through the work of his father, John Avery Lomax, a curator at the Library of Congress and a pioneer in the field of folk music. After college, he toured prisons in the South, recording folk song performances for the Archive of American Song of the Library of Congress. During his travels, he met the great blues singer Huddie Ledbetter ("Leadbelly"). Lomax later became responsible for introducing radio audiences to a number of folk and blues artists, including Woody Guthrie and Burl Ives. Between 1951 and 1958, he traveled throughout Europe, recording hundreds of folk songs in England, Scotland, Italy, and Spain. His most important work is, perhaps, "The Folk Songs of North America" (1959). He also published a number of works with his father, including "American Ballads and Folk Songs" (1934) and "Folk Song: USA" (1946). In addition to his work with folk songs, Lomax was very interested in the historical and social origins of jazz, and he wrote a notable biography of the early jazzman Ferdinand "Jelly Roll" Morton entitled "Mister Jelly Roll" (1950).

Bibliographic information