The Forcing Book: A Manual of the Cultivation of Vegetables in Glass Houses

Front Cover
Macmillan, 1897 - Forcing (Plants) - 266 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 97 - Galloway was able to prepare soil which " gave practically the same results" as that which he imported from Boston. The soil was made as follows : " Mixture of two parts of drift sand and one part of greenhouse soil. The sand was obtained from the valley of a stream near by, which frequently" overflowed its banks, flooding the spot where the material was found. The greenhouse soil was a mixture consisting of one part of the ordinary clay, gneiss soil of * BT Galloway, The Growth of Lettuce as Affected...
Page 96 - Loose at all times, regardless of treatment, it being possible to push the arm into it to a depth of 20 inches or more. Never ' puddles ' when worked, no matter how wet. Clods or lumps never form. A 4-inch dressing of fresh manure when spaded in to a depth of 15 to 20 inches will be completely disintegrated in six or eight weeks. Sufficient water may be added the first of September, when the first crop is started, to carry through two crops and a part of a third without additional applications, except...
Page 105 - There is no remedy, but if the soil is sandy and " sweet " and the house properly managed as to moisture and temperature, and top dressings of manure are avoided, the disease need not be feared. Galloway speaks of it as follows, in the article already quoted : " Wet rot of the lower leaves and rotting of the stems and consequent wilting of the plant are seldom troublesome in this [Boston or sandy] soil if properly handled, because the surface is at all times comparatively...
Page 179 - ... 3. The temperature of the soil may be too near that of the air. A high temperature of the soil makes the roots active, and if the temperature of the air is not considerably higher an excess of water is apt to accumulate in the plant. The aim would be then to have the temperature of the air considerably higher than that of the roots. Lack of proper light also brings about the following harmful conditions: 1. Acids in the plant accumulate in the dark and in strong light they decrease. When there...
Page 107 - The cells, therefore, become excessively turgid and are probably weakened by the presence of organic acids. When the sun suddenly appears, as it often does after a cloudy spell in winter, there is an immediate, rapid rise in temperature and a diminution of the amount of moisture in the air in the greenhouse. Under these conditions the plant rapidly gives off water and if the loss is greater than the roots can supply the tissues first wilt, then collapse and die. The ability of the roots to supply...
Page 92 - The lower pan is half filled with clean, coarse sand, and the upper one contains the sulphur. By its proper use our houses have been kept remarkably free from mildew, even under very adverse circumstances. But there is constant danger that the sulphur will become heated to the burning point, and then the entire stock of plants in the house is lost. This use of sulphur is often very convenient, but the work should be placed in the hands of a most trustworthy person. If a house should be thoroughly...
Page 85 - ... this trouble especial attention must be given to the environment of the plants and those conditions which favor the rapid development of the parasites. These conditions are known in most cases to be high temperature accompanied by a large moisture content of the soil, humid atmosphere, insufficient light and close apartments, and soil which has become thoroughly infested with the fungi by the development of the disease in plants growing in the same. Some excellent notes on the treatment of the...
Page 87 - The waste parts of the plants, particularly the " stems," are utilized by florists and others for purposes of fumigation. These stems, which are almost invariably the dried mid-veins of the leaves, may be obtained for almost nothing at any cigar factory. When wanted for fumigating purposes they should not be too dry, else they will blaze, instead of slowly smouldering and forming a dense smoke. In case the stems are too dry, they may be moistened by sprinkling water upon them ; a better way, however,...
Page 88 - ... experience has not supported this view. Tobacco stems may be burned in a variety of ways. Some gardeners merely pile the required quantity upon a brick or stone floor in the house and set fire to it by means of paper or shavings. An old coal scuttle answers the purpose very well. Figure 75 represents a tobacco-stem burner which we have designed, and which is perhaps as simple, serviceable, and easily managed as any in use. The body of the burner is made of heavy, galvanized sheet-iron. It closely...

Bibliographic information