General view of the agriculture of the county of Essex: with observations on the means of its improvement, Volume 3, Issue 1

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Page 2 - TO THE READER. IT is requested, that this Paper may be returned to the Board of Agriculture, at its office in London, with any additional remarks and observations which may occur on the perusal, -written on the margin, as soon as may be convenient.
Page 30 - ... generally three in number. The pitman digs the chalk and fills the basket, and his companions alternately wind it up, and wheel its contents upon the land; when the basket is wound up to the top of the pit, to stop its descent till emptied the point of a wooden peg, of sufficient length and strength, is thrust by the perpendicular spoke in the wheel into a hole made in the adjoining upright or standard of the frame, to receive it. The pit is sunk from...
Page 2 - AGRICULTURE to come to a resolution of reprinting such as may appear on the whole fit for publication. It is proper at the same time to add, that the Board does not consider itself responsible for any fact or observation contained in the Reports thus reprinted, as it is impossible to consider them yet in a...
Page 31 - ... within three or four feet of the surface, very indifferent, and only fit for lime, or to be laid on roads, gateways, &c. the chalkers must be directed to lay by the chalk for the first three or four feet in depth, to...
Page 15 - The hours of labour are, from six in the morning to six in the evening, during the summer ; in some parts, they are from five till seven, with a proportionate increase of pay : — in winter, from day-break till the close of the evening. During the harvest months, there are no fixed hours of beginning, or leaving work. The average price of labour...
Page 29 - ... a fund for this purpofe, is to let a certain number of acres to fome tenant in the neighbourhood for a courfe of corn cropping, for 3 or 4 years, when it generally rents at from L.
Page 78 - In our own history we may detect signs of its presence as early as the time of Edward I., in whose writs of summons it was said to be " a most equitable rule, that what concerns all should be approved of by all.
Page 52 - Where wastes and commons are most extensive, there I have perceived the cottagers are the most wretched and worthless: accustomed to relie on a precarious and vagabond subsistence...
Page 29 - The method pursued in chalking such land is as under, and the persons employed therein follow it as a trade : a spot is fixed upon nearly centrical to about six acres of the land to be chalked, here a pit, about four feet diameter, is sunk to the chalk, if found within...
Page 99 - These ploughs have lately been much improved by the addition of an iron earthboard firmly screwed to the coulter, called here a flay, for ploughing turf, which takes off the turf, and turns it into the furrow, where the plough immediately covers it with earth : by this management a turf at one ploughing has the appearance of a fallow, and harrows nearly as well.

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