Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books 1 - 10 of 132 on From the moment that any advocate can be permitted to say, that he will or will not....
" From the moment that any advocate can be permitted to say, that he will or will not stand between the Crown and the subject arraigned in the Court where he daily sits to practise, from that moment the liberties of England are at an end. "
The Law Magazine, Or, Quarterly Review of Jurisprudence - Page 13
1844
Full view - About this book

The Universal Magazine, Volume 92

1793
...ills to praftilè, from that moment the liberties of England are at an end. It' the advocate refufes to defend, from what he may think of the charge, or of the defence, he afTumes the character of the judge ; nay, he aflumes it before the hour of judgment ; and, in proportion...
Full view - About this book

Select Speeches, Forensick and Parliamentary: With Prefatory Remarks, Volume 4

Nathaniel Chapman - Trials - 1807
...justice, the most valuable part of the English constitution can have no existence. For from the moment that any advocate can be permitted to say that he...advocate refuses to defend, from what he may think oj the charge or of the defence, he assumes the character of the judge ; nay, he assumes it before...
Full view - About this book

The Speeches of the Hon. Thomas Erskine (now Lord Erskine): When ..., Volume 2

Thomas Erskine Baron Erskine - Freedom of the press - 1810
...justice, the most valuable part of t;he English constitution, can have no existence. From the moment that any advocate can be permitted to say, that he...defence, he assumes the character of the Judge; nay, he as* sumes it before the hour of judgment; and in proportion to his rank and reputation, puts the heavy...
Full view - About this book

The speeches of the Hon. T. Erskine (now Lord Erskine): when at ..., Volume 2

James Ridgway - Freedom of the press - 1813
...VALUABLE PART OF THK ENGLISH CONSTITUTION, CAN HAVE NO EXISTENCE.—From the moment that any advo* cate can be permitted to say, that he will or will not...from that moment the liberties of England are at an end.—If the advocate refuses to defend, from what he may think of the charge or of the defence, he...
Full view - About this book

A Complete Collection of State Trials and Proceedings for High ..., Volume 22

Trials - 1817
...JVSTICE, THE MOST VALUABLE PART OP THE ENGLISH CONSTITUTION, CAN HAVE NO EXISTENCE. — From the moment that any advocate can be permitted to say, that he...subject arraigned in the court where he daily sits to practice, from that moment the liberties of England are at an end. — If the advocate refases to defend,...
Full view - About this book

Cobbett's Complete Collection of State Trials and Proceedings for ..., Volume 22

Thomas Bayly Howell, Thomas Jones Howell - Law reports, digests, etc - 1817
...JUSTICE, THE MOST VALUABLE РАПТ OF THE ENGLISH CONSTITUTION, CAN HAVE NO EXISTENCE. From tllC moment that any advocate can be permitted to say, that he will or will nui stand between the Crown and the subject arraigned in the court where he daily sits to practise,...
Full view - About this book

The Paisley magazine

...biography of Lord Chancellor Erskine to accomplish this. " From the moment," said that celebrated writer, " that any advocate can be permitted to say, that he...what he may think of the charge, or of the defence, Le assumes the character of the judge ; nay, he assumes it before the hour of judgment, and in proportion...
Full view - About this book

The Works of Francis Bacon, Lord Chancellor of England: A New Edition:

Francis Bacon, Basil Montagu - 1834
...justice, the most valuable part of the English constitution, can have no existence. From the moment that any advocate can be permitted to say that he...the subject arraigned in the court where he daily sils to practise, from that moment the liberties of England are at an end. If the advocate refuses...
Full view - About this book

Gems of genius; or, Words of the wise: a collection of the most pointed ...

Andrew Steinmetz - 1838
...before you.—Ib. 233. OPINION is free, CONDUCT only is amenable to law.—Ib. 234. From the moment that any advocate can be permitted to say, that he...subject arraigned in the court where he daily sits to practice, from that moment the liberties of England are at an end—if the advocate refuses to defend,...
Full view - About this book

The Monthly chronicle; a national journal

1840
...attorney-generalship to the Prince of Wales, is as true as it is eloquent and brave. " From the moment that any advocate can be permitted to say that he...think of the charge or of the defence, he assumes the cJutracter of the judge, nay, he assumes it before the hour of judgment ; and, in proportion to his...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF