The U.S. Press and Iran: Foreign Policy and the Journalism of Deference

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University of California Press, Aug 24, 1988 - Political Science - 300 pages
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No one seriously interested in the character of public knowledge and the quality of debate over American alliances can afford to ignore the complex link between press and policy and the ways in which mainstream journalism in the U.S. portrays a Third World ally. The case of Iran offers a particularly rich view of these dynamics and suggests that the press is far from fulfilling the watchdog role assigned it in democratic theory and popular imagination.
 

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Contents

Iran the Press and Foreign Policy
11
Mosaddeq and the US Press 19511953
31
The Consolidation of Power 19541962
63
Modernization Myth and Media 19631973
82
Further Illusions 19631973
116
The New Persian Empire 19731977
131
The Press and the 1978 Revolution West Meets East
152
Journalism as Capitalism
183
The Journalism of Deference
201
Conclusion
229
Notes
237
Index
265
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About the author (1988)

William A. Dorman is Professor of Journalism at California State University, Sacramento. Mansour Farhang, who was revolutionary Iran's first ambassador to the United Nations, is now Professor of Politics at Bennington College.

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