The Assassination of Fred Hampton: How the FBI and the Chicago Police Murdered a Black Panther

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Chicago Review Press, Nov 1, 2009 - Biography & Autobiography - 424 pages
12 Reviews
Uncovering a cold-blooded execution at the hands of a conspiring police force, this engaging account relentlessly pursues the murderers of Black Panther Fred Hampton. Documenting the entire 14-year process of bringing the killers to justice, this chronicle also depicts the 18-month court trial in detail. Revealing Hampton himself in a new light, this examination presents him as a dynamic community leader whose dedication to his people and to the truth inspired the young lawyers of the People's Law Office, solidifying their lifelong commitment to fighting corruption. Contending with FBI stonewalling and unlimited government resources bent on hiding a darker plot, this reconstruction relates an inspiring narrative of upholding morality in one man's memory.
 

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Review: The Assassination of Fred Hampton: How the FBI and the Chicago Police Murdered a Black Panther

User Review  - Eboni - Goodreads

Good to read this story from a legal standpoint. Lots of facts and evidence that is often overlooked when this moment in history is revisited... Read full review

Review: The Assassination of Fred Hampton: How the FBI and the Chicago Police Murdered a Black Panther

User Review  - James - Goodreads

Every American should read this book. Read full review

Contents

Rendezvous with Death
Exposing the Murder
The FBIs Clandestine Operation
Injustice on Trial
Vindication
Epilogue
Acknowledgments
Glossary
Sources
Index
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2009)

Jeffrey Haas is an attorney and cofounder of the People's Law Office, whose clients included the Black Panthers, Students for a Democratic Society, community activists, and a large number of those opposed to the Vietnam War. He has handled cases involving prisoners' rights, Puerto Rican nationalists, protestors opposed to human rights violations in Central America, police torture, and the wrongfully accused. He lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico.