Sophocles: With an English Translation, Volume 2

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Page 19 - Warned by these sights, Odysseus, see that thou Utter no boastful word against the gods, Nor swell with pride if haply might of arm Exalt thee o'er thy fellows, or vast wealth. A day can prostrate and a day upraise All that is mortal ; but the gods approve Sobriety and frowardness abhor.
Page 375 - Odysseus: Son of a gallant sire, I too in youth Was slow of tongue and forward with my hand; But I have learnt by trial of mankind Mightier than deeds of puissance is the tongue. Neoptolemus: It comes to this that thou would'st have me lie. Odysseus: Entangle Philoctetes by deceit. Neoptolemus: Why not persuade him rather than deceive? Odysseus: Persuasion's vain, and force of no avail. Neoptolemus: What arms hath he of such miraculous might? Odysseus: Unerring arrows, tipp'd with instant death....
Page 122 - Phocian messenger and announce to Clytemnestra that Orestes has been killed in a chariot race at the Pythian games.
Page 259 - E'en in my childhood's home, while yet I dwelt At Pleuron with my father, I had dread Of marriage more than any Aetolian maid ; For my first wooer was a river god, Acheloiis, who in triple form appeared To sue my father Oeneus...
Page 223 - Orestes, woe is me, If I am not to give thee burial. ORESTES: Guard well thy lips; thou hast no right to mourn. ELECTRA: No right to mourn a brother who is dead! ORESTES: To speak of him in this wise is not meet. ELECTRA: What, am I so dishonoured of the dead? ORESTES: Of none dishonoured; this is not thy part. ELECTRA: Not if Orestes
Page 267 - For as the tireless South or Northern blast Billow on billow rolls o'er ocean wide, So on the son of Cadmus follows fast Sea upon sea of trouble, tide on tide; And now he sinks, now rises; still some god Is nigh to save him from Death's whelming flood.
Page 71 - ... Thus on my part all is ready; and next be thou, O Zeus — as is meet — the first to aid me: 'tis no large boon that I will crave. Send, I pray thee, some messenger with the ill news to Teucer, that he may be the first to raise me where I have fallen on this reeking sword, lest I be first espied by some enemy, and cast forth a prey to dogs and birds. For thus much, 0 Zeus, I entreat thee; and I call also on Hermes, guide to the nether world, that he lay me softly asleep, without a struggle,...
Page 249 - OI am spoiled, undone! yet suffer me, One little word. ELECTRA Brother, in heaven's name Let him not speak a word or plead his cause. When a poor wretch is in the toils of fate What can a brief reprieve avail him? No, Slay him outright and having slain him give His corse to such grave-makers...
Page 237 - ... which are too long to quote in full. Here is Electra's recognition of the Paidagogus (1354) : O happy day ! O sole deliverer Of Agamemnon's house, how cam'st thou hither ? Art thou indeed our saviour who redeemed From endless woes my brother and myself ? O hands beloved, O messenger whose feet Were bringers of glad tidings, how so long Couldst thou be with me and remain unknown, Stay me with feigned fables and conceal The truth that gave me life ? Hail, father, hail! For 'tis a father whom I...
Page 375 - ODYSSEUS Son of a gallant sire, I too in youth Was slow of tongue and forward with my hand ; But I have learnt by trial of mankind Mightier than deeds of puissance is the tongue. NEOPTOLEMUS It comes to this that thou would'st have me lie. ODYSSEUS Entangle Philoctetes by deceit. NEOPTOLEMUS Why not persuade him rather than deceive ? ODYSSEUS Persuasion's vain, and force of no avail. NEOPTOLEMUS What arms hath he of such miraculous might ? ODYSSEUS Unerring arrows, tipp'd with instant death. NEOPTOLEMUS...

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