Walt Whitman's Leaves of Grass

Front Cover
Penguin, 1986 - Poetry - 145 pages
One of the great innovative figures in American letters, Walt Whitman created a daringly new kind of poetry that became a major force in world literature. "Leaves Of Grass" is his one book. First published in 1855 with only twelve poems, it was greeted by Ralph Waldo Emerson as "the wonderful gift . . . the most extraordinary piece of wit and wisdom that America has yet contributed." Over the course of Whitman's life, the book reappeared in many versions, expanded and transformed as the author's experiences and the nation's history changed and grew. Whitman's ambition was to creates something uniquely American. In that he succeeded. His poems have been woven into the very fabric of the American character. From his solemn masterpieces "When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd" and "Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking" to the joyous freedom of "Song of Myself, " "I Sing the Body Electric, " and "Song of the Open Road, " Whitman's work lives on, an inspiration to the poets of later generations.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Backus2 - LibraryThing

This book is an inspiration to all writers. Whitman's subject matter is based on nature, work, spirituality, war, and the experience of reading a writing. And the style is free-verse. Powerful, for high school. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - LisaMaria_C - LibraryThing

This slim book was assigned to me in college and was my introduction to Walt William. This is the first 1855 edition of only 12 poems, later given titles: "Song of Myself," "A Song For Occupations ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Whitmans Introduction
5
Song of Myself
25
A Song for Occupations
87
To Think of Time
98
The Sleepers
105
I Sing the Body Electric
116
Faces
124
Song of the Answerer
129
Europe The 72d and 73d Years of These States
133
A Boston Ballad
135
There Was a Child Went Forth
138
Who Learns My Lesson Complete
140
Great Are the Myths
142
Copyright

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About the author (1986)

Walt Whitman (1819-1892) was born on Long Island and educated in Brooklyn, New York. He served as a printer's devil, journeyman compositor, itinerant schoolteacher, editor, and unofficial nurse to Northern and Southern soldiers.


Malcolm Cowley (1898–1989) a leadiing literary figure of his time, wrote numerous books of literary criticism, essays, and poetry.

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