Notes & Queries, Volume 5

Front Cover
Oxford University Press, 1852 - Questions and answers
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 76 - In the most high and palmy state of Rome, A little ere the mightiest Julius fell, The graves stood tenantless, and the sheeted dead Did squeak and gibber in the Roman streets...
Page 340 - A little child, a limber elf, Singing, dancing to itself, A fairy thing with red round cheeks, That always finds, and never seeks, Makes such a vision to the sight As fills a father's eyes with light...
Page 32 - And I will come down and talk with thee there : and I will take of the spirit which is upon thee, and will put it upon them ; and they shall bear the burden of the people with thee, that thou bear it not thyself alone.
Page 179 - The primogenitive and due of birth, Prerogative of age, crowns, sceptres, laurels, But by degree, stand in authentic place...
Page 297 - I do not like thee, Dr. Fell ; The reason why I cannot tell ; But this I know, and know full well, I do not like thee, Dr. Fell," who rudely called Hobbes " irritabile illud ct vanissimum Malmsburiense animal.
Page 118 - Thou hast most traitorously corrupted the youth of the realm in erecting a grammar-school : and whereas, before, our forefathers had no other books but the score and the tally, thou hast caused printing to be used ; and, contrary to the king, his crown, and dignity, thou hast built a papermill.
Page 131 - Where by divers sundry old authentic histories and chronicles it is manifestly declared and expressed that this realm of England is an empire, and so hath been accepted in the world, governed by one supreme head and king having the dignity and royal estate of the imperial crown of the same, unto whom a body politic, compact of all sorts and degrees of people divided in terms and by names of spiritualty and temporalty, be bounden and owe to bear next to God a natural and humble obedience...
Page 155 - It is astonishing how little obsolete the language of it is, even at this day ; and in point of perspicuity and noble simplicity, propriety of idiom, and purity of style, no English version has yet surpassed it.
Page 109 - The wild swan's death-hymn took the soul Of that waste place with joy Hidden in sorrow : at first to the ear The warble was low, and full and clear; And floating about the under-sky, Prevailing in weakness the coronach...
Page 101 - The sublime and the ridiculous are often so nearly related that it is difficult to class them separately. One step above the sublime makes the ridiculous, and one step above the ridiculous makes the sublime again...

Bibliographic information